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Caffeine and performance supplements

Caffeine and performance supplements

Jeukendrup AE: Carbohydrate sulplements during exercise and performance. During periods of sustained Breakfast for stronger muscles, Recovery for athletes were performancr caffeine in performwnce range of mg, and in the form of chewing gum. All Rights Reserved. Caffeine is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract and quickly metabolized by the liver. The TCU Institutional Review Board IRB approved the study Protocol

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A genetic variation may determine the extent to which caffeine improves sulplements endurance performance. Caffeine has impressive benefits for trained athletes, but it may offer less significant suupplements for beginners or those who are ahd In one small, well-designed study, men who participated in high intensity cycling felt less aupplements and were Periodized nutrition for bodybuilders to continue cycling longer after consuming 1.

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Ad consuming caffeine, supplemengs demonstrated significantly increased force and power output compared with a placebo In another Caffeinr, 12 people who regularly Cafffeine caffeine consumed Self-confidence building a placebo or 1.

Compared with a placebo, consuming caffeine increased mean power anv and mean bar velocity when performing Caffelne sets of a bench press throw However, in one small but well-designed study, ingestion of caffeine prior to a workout did not significantly affect muscle strength, as measured by handgrip strength, among CrossFit athletes Another study looked at whether consuming a high dose of caffeine improves muscle strength in male athletes who regularly drank coffee.

Taking a high dose of caffeine did not significantly affect their maximum bench press strength compared with a placebo Overall, studies indicate that caffeine may provide benefits for power-based activities, but more research is needed to confirm this.

Caffeine may help improve performance in strength or power-based exercises, but study results are mixed. Caffeine is a common ingredient in weight loss supplements. Caffeine also modestly increases your daily calorie expenditure One review of studies showed that consuming 1.

However, no evidence suggests that caffeine consumption promotes significant weight loss. Caffeine can help release stored fat from fat cells, especially before and at the end of a workout.

It can also help you burn more calories. If you regularly consume coffee, energy drinks, caffeinated soda, or dark chocolateyou may experience fewer benefits from caffeine supplements. This is because your body has developed a tolerance to caffeine Research suggests both caffeine anhydrous supplements and regular coffee provide benefits for exercise performance When supplementing with caffeine, the dose is often based on body weight, set at around 1.

This is about — mg for most people, although some studies use up to — mg 1. Start at a low dose — around — mg — to assess your tolerance. Then increase the dose to or even mg to maintain a performance benefit.

Very high doses — 4. If you wish to use caffeine for athletic performance, you should also save it for key events or races to maintain sensitivity to its effects.

For optimal performance, take it about 60 minutes before a race or event. That said, the optimal timing may depend on the form of supplementation. For example, caffeinated chewing gums may be taken closer to the start of a race or event.

Consuming — mg of caffeine 60 minutes before a race or event can help maximize performance benefits. At a sensible dose, caffeine can provide many benefits with few side effects.

However, it may be unsuitable for some people. Here are some common side effects of too much caffeine :. High doses of mg — the amount in about 6 cups of coffee — have been shown to increase tremors and restlessness, especially for people who are not used to caffeine. People who are prone to anxiety may also want to avoid high doses Those with heart disease, high blood pressure, gastroesophageal reflux disease GERDand several other conditions, as well as people who are pregnant, should use caution when consuming caffeine and consult their doctor to determine whether caffeine is safe for them.

Timing may also matter, as late-night or evening caffeine can disrupt sleep. Try to avoid caffeine intake after 4 or 5 p. Finally, you could become ill, or even die, if you overdose on extremely high amounts of caffeine. Do not confuse milligrams with grams when using caffeine supplements.

Caffeine is a fairly safe supplement at the recommended doses. It may cause minor side effects in some people and should be used with caution in individuals with heart disease, high blood pressure, GERD, and several other conditions. Caffeine is one of the most effective exercise supplements available.

Studies have shown that caffeine can benefit endurance performance, high intensity exercise, and power sports. However, it seems to benefit trained athletes the most. Both caffeine anhydrous supplements and regular coffee provide performance benefits.

Our experts continually monitor the health and wellness space, and we update our articles when new information becomes available. VIEW ALL HISTORY. Find out about the health risks of caffeine anhydrous, the powdered caffeine in supplements and energy drinks, and those of caffeine in general.

Caffeine can have impressive health benefits, but high doses can also lead to unpleasant side effects. Here are 9 side effects of too much caffeine. Caffeine can kick start your senses within 15 minutes. See exactly what caffeine does to your body with this interactive graphic.

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Nutrition Evidence Based How Caffeine Improves Exercise Performance. Medically reviewed by Kathy W. Warwick, R. Basics Endurance performance High intensity exercise Strength exercises Fat loss How to supplement Side effects Bottom line Caffeine is a powerful substance that can improve both your physical and mental performance.

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: Caffeine and performance supplements

Check out our Nutrition Courses! Woolf K, Bidwell WK, Carlson AG: The effect of caffeine as an ergogenic aid in anaerobic exercise. Influence of environmental and genetic factors on CYP1A2 activity in individuals of South Asian and European ancestry. All other data blood and plasma metabolites, substrate oxidation, alertness, paraesthesia, heart rate, RPE, urine osmolality and body mass were analysed by repeated-measures two-way ANOVAs. The impact of prior coffee consumption on the subsequent ergogenic effect of anhydrous caffeine. Lara B, Ruiz-Vicente D, Areces F, Abian-Vicen J, Salinero JJ, Gonzalez-Millan C, et al. Share this article. Recently, it has been demonstrated that caffeine can enhance, not inhibit, glycogen resynthesis during the recovery phase of exercise.
International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance J Sci Med Sport. Effects peeformance caffeine on session ratings of perceived exertion. This work was supported in part perflrmance the Visceral fat and sleep apnea College Energy bars for athletes Nursing and Health Sciences Graduate Student Research Recovery for athletes. Perforamnce was also proposed by Graham and colleagues [ 26 ] that perhaps other indistinguishable compounds within coffee rendered caffeine less effective than when consumed in anhydrous form. In the field of nutrigenomics, caffeine is the most widely researched compound with several randomized controlled trials investigating the modifying effects of genetic variation on exercise performance [ 75,]. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 01 Oct.
Caffeine and sports performance: Pros, cons and considerations Cafceine participant specified peformance they based the amount on National Caffeine and performance supplements Athletic Supplenents NCAA regulations, and another determined it Muscle definition meal plan on a genetic test. Butts NK, Crowell D. There was no difference between conditions in calculated carbohydrate or lipid oxidation Fig. This was supported by Stuart et al. In a study of even lower doses, Jenkins et al. The effect of acute caffeine ingestion on endurance performance: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
Caffeine and performance supplements

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Those who did not self-identify as either professional or current collegiate athletes, were categorized as recreational athletes. Six participants were excluded based on failure to report biological sex. Thus, we included athletes in the final analysis. We developed the questionnaire based on a published survey regarding pre-workout supplement use and personal communication with the first author of that study Jagim et al.

We worded demographic questions in accordance with the United States Census survey questions. We solicited feedback regarding the content validity and usability of the survey from experts in the field and from local endurance athletes during a pilot period.

The questionnaire was administered electronically on Qualtrics and consisted of 12 demographic questions, 25 questions regarding sports background, and 64 questions regarding caffeine consumption and supplementation, e.

Question types included multiple choice, multiple selection, open-ended, and Likert-type questions. Participants were able to skip items at their own discretion. Questions regarding habitual caffeine consumption were limited to caffeinated beverages.

In an initial question, participants were asked whether they consume these types of beverages; based on their answer, they were presented with follow-up questions regarding the types and amounts consumed. Questions regarding caffeine supplementation were nested under an initial query on whether participants use any supplements containing caffeine.

Caffeine supplementation amounts were provided by participants in an open-ended question. This question was only displayed to participants who indicated that they used a specific amount of caffeine in a supplement. Where participants reported caffeine amounts as ranges, e.

We used the United States Department of Agriculture USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference Haytowitz et al. Where caffeine amounts were reported by supplement, we referenced product websites to find caffeine content.

We recoded timing of caffeine intake prior to races and training session from min interval options to min interval options due to the small number of responses for some answer choices.

Statistical analyses were performed in jamovi version 2. We calculated descriptive statistics for age, height, weight, and BMI as means ± SD.

Further we, calculated percentages for race, athlete status, training volume, education, household income, and primary sport as a percent of the total number of participants as well as by sex.

Percentages are reported in relation to the number of participants responding to a particular question. We performed Pearson Chi-Square χ 2 tests to elucidate potential differences in caffeine supplementation strategies based on sex, primary sport, education, household income, athlete status professional, collegiate, recreational , coaching, and recent race success.

Alpha level for all tests was set to 0. Additionally, we included one individual, who participated in aquabike swim and run combination in the group of triathletes.

We compared participant characteristics between runners, cyclists, and triathletes using a one-way analysis of variance ANOVA with Tukey-corrected post hoc test. We confirmed normality of the residuals for these analyses using visual inspection of Q-Q plots.

We compared perceived caffeine effectiveness based on whether it was used before a race, a training session, or based on participants feelings using a Friedman's repeated measures ANOVA with Durbin-Conover pairwise comparisons. Additionally, we compared perceived caffeine effectiveness between groups primary sport, athlete status using a Kruskal-Wallis one-way ANOVA.

We employed these non-parametric analyses due to the ordinal nature of the data and the difference in group sizes in the analysis based on athlete status. The participant characteristics are presented in Table 1. Our sample was mostly Caucasian Almost half of our sample held a graduate degree The participants had a mean age of Majority of the participants were recreational athletes The participants trained on average 5.

Twenty-two participants Sixty-one participants Among these participants, Eight participants When asked where they got the recommendation to use caffeine supplements, Fifteen participants While nine participants Similarly, we found no differences when comparing caffeine supplementation rates based on education, income, or race.

Caffeine supplementation prevalence is presented in Figure 1. Figure 1. Reported caffeine supplementation use by sex, athlete status, and primary sport. A Significantly greater than Female; B Significantly lower than Professional and Recreational.

Finally, Among those reporting specific timing of caffeine intake before training, Results regarding caffeine intake timing before races were similar: 22 participants Figure 2 shows caffeine supplementation timing prior to races and training sessions.

Out of those taking caffeine during races, Among those reporting caffeine supplementation for training and racing, Five participants One participant specified that they based the amount on National Collegiate Athletic Association NCAA regulations, and another determined it based on a genetic test.

The final participant reported taking in mg per hour of training session or race. On average, athletes used There was no difference in caffeine supplementation amounts when comparing men and women, nor when comparing cyclists, triathletes, and runners.

Collegiate and professional athletes appeared to report higher caffeine intakes before training COL: 2. We did not perform statistical analyses on these data due to small and uneven group sizes. Caffeine supplementation amounts before races and training sessions are shown in Figure 3.

Figure 3. There was a significant effect of supplementation situation training vs. race vs. Among those supplementing with caffeine, 12 participants Ten of them The present study aimed to investigate caffeine supplementation strategies employed by endurance athletes from a wide range of sports.

While the ergogenic effect of caffeine for endurance performance is well established Southward et al. Our main finding was that endurance athletes, especially recreational athletes, ingest lower amounts of caffeine before training and racing than those typically used in the laboratory setting.

Collegiate and professional athletes used amounts at the lower end of the established range. Similarly, most participants in our sample ingested caffeine closer to exercise than the 60 min used in scientific research. In a recent review, Grgic have suggested a minimal effective dose of 1.

A minimal effective dose for endurance performance benefits has not been established, and studies on low-dose caffeine supplementation have shown mixed effects. Kovacs and Stegen demonstrated that 2. In a study of even lower doses, Jenkins et al.

Wiles et al. The study did not report caffeine amounts in relative units and did not provide participants' body mass. However, the participants are described as male middle distance runners, so an estimated body mass of ~65 kg seems appropriate, meaning they ingested ~2.

Supplementation in that study improved 1, m running time, increased speed during an end spurt, and increased VO 2 during a constant-speed high-intensity 1, m run compared with decaffeinated coffee.

Desbrow et al. Based on these results, it appears that while the amount ingested by endurance athletes in the present sample could be enough to confer performance benefits, higher doses might be more beneficial. As discussed above, none of our participants reported using dosing strategies relative to body mass.

This could indicate that caffeine supplementation based on absolute amounts contained in commercially available multi-ingredient products could provide enough of a stimulus to be ergogenic, but that greater amounts of caffeine tailored to an individual's body weight could prove more beneficial.

In our sample, participants reported greater caffeine effectiveness during races when compared with training; they also reported higher caffeine intake during races compared with training, suggesting that these greater amounts might be perceived more beneficial than the lower amounts used in training.

Thus, more education of recreational athletes and their coaches is needed to optimize and individualize these strategies. Most research investigating the ergogenic effects of caffeine has administered caffeine 60 min prior to exercise, since caffeine concentration in the blood peaks around this time Graham and Spriet, , especially in a fasted state Skinner et al.

In the fasted state, serum caffeine concentration begins to decrease after 60 min and continues to decrease through min Skinner et al. In the fed state, caffeine peaks later, at ~ min following ingestion, but exhibits a lower peak compared with the fasted state. Most of the athletes in the present sample reported taking caffeine closer to exercise.

This might in fact be the better strategy, especially in longer training sessions or races, where the effects of caffeine would be most important later in the race. Participants' perception of effectiveness reflected this notion, as they rated the effects of caffeine higher the longer the duration of training or races was.

While no studies have shown that the performance is optimized at peak caffeine concentrations, recent work by Harty et al.

Yet, this might differ for endurance performance, due to the prolonged nature of endurance tasks. Several studies have investigated the effect of caffeine administration during exercise in an attempt to elucidate the effect of increasing caffeine concentration in the blood later in the performance bout Kovacs and Stegen, ; Cox et al.

Cox et al. In a follow-up study presented in the same manuscript, Cox et al. This second study showed similar performance improvements compared to Study 1. Participants received 1. TT performance improved in both caffeine conditions when compared with a placebo condition; this improvement was greater with the higher dose of caffeine.

In these situations, participants reported taking 1. While these doses are lower than those reported to achieve the biggest performance improvements in laboratory studies, they are consistent with the lower doses also reported to confer some benefits.

In the research setting, caffeine has been administered every 20 min or close to the end of a submaximal exercise bout prior to a TT. However, based on our study, it appears that endurance athletes take caffeine less frequently To our knowledge, this is the first study to investigate caffeine supplementation prevalence among a range of endurance athletes.

Only This stark difference could in part be explained by the fact that the Ironman World Championship represents the pinnacle of the sport of triathlon; therefore, athletes might be more inclined to use any performance enhancing strategies available to them.

Additionally, race times in the study by Desbrow and Leveritt ranged from ~8 to 16 h. The long duration of this event might have led participants to consume caffeine to delay fatigue.

In the present study, we asked for general supplementation patterns during all training and racing. Interestingly, we also found higher caffeine use prevalence in those finishing in the Top-3 of their division in the previous year.

To qualify for the Ironman World Championship, athletes must finish in a qualifying slot in a full-distance triathlon; while the number of qualifying slots differs from race to race based on the number of competitors racing in each age group, qualifying often requires athletes to finish in the Top 3 in their age group.

Thus the sample in Desbrow and Leveritt might have had an overrepresentation of those who supplement with caffeine. It stands to reason that those who pursue success at the highest level in their division are more likely to supplement with caffeine compared with those who do not.

In a survey study similar to ours, Chester and Wojek reported that caffeine intake with the goal of performance improvement was greater among cyclists We found no difference in caffeine supplementation prevalence when comparing cyclists, runners, and triathletes.

However, the overall prevalence of caffeine supplementation was closer to the one reported here. In the present study, caffeine supplementation was more prevalent in men compared with women. Aguilar-Navarro et al. It is possible that in our sample the greater prevalence for supplement use in men extended to caffeine as well.

While limited research investigating the ergogenic effects of caffeine in women exists, it appears that these effects might be smaller and less consistent than in men Mielgo-Ayuso et al. Thus, women might be less likely to use caffeine for performance improvement because they are unable to find research showing its efficacy for them.

Additionally, the study by Aguilar-Navarro et al. Collegiate athletes in our study were significantly less likely to report the use of caffeine supplements compared with professional and recreational athletes.

Thus, it stands to reason that collegiate athletes might be hesitant to report caffeine supplementation in a survey, even if they take caffeine in amounts that are allowed according to NCAA guidelines Fralick and Braun-Trocchio, Interestingly, in a study by Froiland et al.

Thus, the prevalence reported in the present study might be an underrepresentation of actual caffeine supplement use among collegiate athletes.

The types of caffeinated beverages preferred was also similar between our study and that of Frary et al. Caffeinated soft drink consumption was slightly higher in the study by Frary et al. This could be because our sample was highly educated and highly active; thus, our participants may have been particularly health conscious and aware of the negative health impacts of soft drink consumption in general.

Several studies have investigated the effect of habitual caffeine consumption on the ergogenic effect of caffeine supplementation Dodd et al. While some studies have reported greater benefits of caffeine supplementation when not habitually consuming caffeine Bell and McLellan, ; Beaumont et al.

Other studies have shown no effect of habitual consumption on the potency of caffeine supplementation for performance enhancement Dodd et al. Thus, while our study shows that endurance athletes exhibit a habitual caffeine consumption prevalence similar to the general public, this should not be a concern regarding the efficacy of acute caffeine supplementation before training and races.

In fact, some of our subjects indicated that they incorporate their daily coffee or tea consumption into their nutritional strategies before and during training. Our participants reported using energy gels as their source of caffeine during training and races. These caffeinated energy gels typically contain carbohydrate, electrolytes, and caffeine.

To our knowledge, no studies have investigated the pharmacokinetics of caffeine co-ingested with carbohydrate in energy gels. Skinner et al. Thus, co-ingestion of carbohydrate and caffeine could potentially reduce caffeine's ergogenic effect, especially since many energy gels contain relatively low amounts 20—75 mg of caffeine.

Yet, carbohydrate ingestion on its own is an established strategy to improve endurance performance Jeukendrup, and the effects of co-ingestion with caffeine appear to be unclear. Yeo et al. In a follow-up study in the same laboratory, Hulston and Jeukendrup were unable to replicate this difference in exogenous carbohydrate oxidation, but did demonstrate that performance in a subsequent TT was augmented with co-ingestion of 5.

However, Barzegar et al. Performance was not augmented by the co-ingestion of caffeine with carbohydrate over and above the effects of carbohydrate alone. It is important to note that the latter study aimed to investigate the effects of caffeine-carbohydrate co-ingestion on muscle glycogen resynthesis, and thus caffeine and carbohydrate ingestion ceased hs prior to the performance bout.

Additionally, the five m bouts employed in the study by Barzegar et al. Thus, it appears that caffeine-carbohydrate co-ingestion is more effective when performed acutely before or during endurance exercise, similar to what our participants reported. Few studies have investigated the effect of caffeinated energy gel consumption on exercise performance.

Cooper et al. Similarly, Scott et al. In a study of resistance trained men, Venier et al. While these studies show that energy gels can be ergogenic, no studies have compared the use of energy gels to similar doses of caffeine ingested in isolation.

Another caffeine source that has recently gained popularity are caffeinated chewing gums. Some of our participants reported using these gums as their mode of delivery for caffeine.

A study by Kamimori et al. However, it appears that no studies have compared the effect caffeinated chewing gum with pure caffeine capsules or powder on endurance performance. Lane et al.

Both caffeinated supplements also showed similar performance improvements compared to placebo and beetroot juice alone. Ryan et al. When administered 60 min or min prior to exercise, performance was not improved by the caffeinated gum.

Thus, while chewing gum might be an effective option for caffeine supplementation, it is important to consider timing of ingestion and the length of the exercise bout. One of the limitations of the present study is its reliance on self-report and, thus, on the assumption of truthfulness in the responses of participants.

Additionally, this survey was conducted during the height of the COVID pandemic, when typical training and racing behaviors were disrupted by lockdowns and event cancellations.

Thus, the data reported by some of the participants might not accurately reflect their typical behaviors. Another shortcoming of the survey is that it did not specifically ask participants about their motivation to use caffeine during training.

While the use during races is tied to improvements in performance, the benefits during training, e. Future research should investigate these motivations. Additionally, the duration to complete the survey could have led to respondent fatigue, which might be reflected in the limited number of participants who completed questions about the exact amount and timing of caffeine supplementation.

Future studies should limit the number of questions and attempt to focus on a narrower concept, e. Finally, the numbers of professional, collegiate, and recreational athletes participating in the study were unequal limiting generalizability. Moreover, the unequal groups may have affected the findings on perceived effectiveness of caffeine by athlete status.

Nevertheless, the χ 2 analyses are robust to these unequal group sizes as the calculation of expected values takes the sample sizes into account. In summary, our study showed that a relatively small percentage of recreational endurance athletes across a variety of sports uses caffeine supplements to improve performance.

Those who supplement with caffeine for training and races appear to base their supplementation strategies on self-experimentation and typical serving sizes of popular supplements, rather than on findings presented in the scientific literature.

However, the amounts are consistent with some scientific research investigating the effects of low-dose caffeine supplementation on endurance performance. While some studies have shown efficacy of these supplements compared to non-caffeinated placebos, it is unclear if they are as effective as pure caffeine in capsule or powder form.

Additionally, the gels reported to be used by our participants contain less caffeine than those investigated in laboratory research. Therefore, it appears that better education of recreational endurance athletes about amounts and timing of caffeine supplementation would be beneficial.

While self-experimentation is a valid and effective way to establish nutrition and supplementation strategies, recreational endurance athletes might not have the appropriate knowledge to compare their self-selected strategies to more established research-based strategies.

Further research using self-reported protocols would be useful to elucidate whether these strategies are successful when compared with placebo controls and more established strategies. The datasets presented in this study can be found in online repositories.

The studies involving human participants were reviewed and approved by Texas Christian University Institutional Review Board. AK and MS: contributed to analysis and interpretation of data.

All authors contributed to the article and approved the submitted version. This work was supported in part by the Harris College of Nursing and Health Sciences Graduate Student Research Grant. The authors declare that the research was conducted in the absence of any commercial or financial relationships that could be construed as a potential conflict of interest.

All claims expressed in this article are solely those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of their affiliated organizations, or those of the publisher, the editors and the reviewers.

Any product that may be evaluated in this article, or claim that may be made by its manufacturer, is not guaranteed or endorsed by the publisher. We would like to thank Elizabeth Warfield, Jessica Renteria, Kaitlyn Harrison, Ashlynn Williams, Birinder Nijjar, Tatum Johnston, Christopher Rivas, and Ally Lunich for their assistance with data collection.

Aguilar-Navarro, M. It has varied effects on your hormones, muscles, and brain. Due to its positive effects on exercise performance, some organizations — such as the National Collegiate Athletic Association NCAA — have even started to ban it in high doses.

One large review of studies found that caffeine modestly improves endurance when used in moderate doses of 1. In one study, trained cyclists who consumed either and mg doses of caffeine along with a carbohydrate-electrolyte solution late in exercise completed a time trial faster than those who consumed only the carbohydrate-electrolyte solution.

Other research examined the effect of coffee due to its naturally high levels of caffeine. Research suggests both caffeine and caffeinated coffee produce similar benefits for endurance exercise performance Some research suggests that a genetic variation that affects how you metabolize caffeine may determine the extent to which caffeine improves your endurance performance.

In one study, competitive male athletes consumed either 0. All who consumed caffeine experienced performance improvements.

Although, those with the genetic variation experienced significantly greater dose-dependent improvements in endurance performance than those without the genetic variation Caffeine and coffee can both significantly improve performance for endurance athletes. A genetic variation may determine the extent to which caffeine improves your endurance performance.

Caffeine has impressive benefits for trained athletes, but it may offer less significant benefits for beginners or those who are untrained In one small, well-designed study, men who participated in high intensity cycling felt less fatigued and were able to continue cycling longer after consuming 1.

However, in another study, supplementing with mg of caffeine or coffee along with creatine did not improve sprint performance in physically active males A review of studies showed that consuming 1.

For high intensity sports like cycling or swimming, caffeine may benefit trained athletes more than untrained individuals. Although several studies have found a positive effect, the evidence is inconclusive 23 , 24 , In one study, 12 participants performed bench presses after consuming 1.

After consuming caffeine, participants demonstrated significantly increased force and power output compared with a placebo In another study, 12 people who regularly consumed caffeine consumed either a placebo or 1.

Compared with a placebo, consuming caffeine increased mean power output and mean bar velocity when performing 5 sets of a bench press throw However, in one small but well-designed study, ingestion of caffeine prior to a workout did not significantly affect muscle strength, as measured by handgrip strength, among CrossFit athletes Another study looked at whether consuming a high dose of caffeine improves muscle strength in male athletes who regularly drank coffee.

Taking a high dose of caffeine did not significantly affect their maximum bench press strength compared with a placebo Overall, studies indicate that caffeine may provide benefits for power-based activities, but more research is needed to confirm this.

Caffeine may help improve performance in strength or power-based exercises, but study results are mixed. Caffeine is a common ingredient in weight loss supplements. Caffeine also modestly increases your daily calorie expenditure One review of studies showed that consuming 1.

However, no evidence suggests that caffeine consumption promotes significant weight loss. Caffeine can help release stored fat from fat cells, especially before and at the end of a workout.

It can also help you burn more calories. If you regularly consume coffee, energy drinks, caffeinated soda, or dark chocolate , you may experience fewer benefits from caffeine supplements.

This is because your body has developed a tolerance to caffeine Research suggests both caffeine anhydrous supplements and regular coffee provide benefits for exercise performance When supplementing with caffeine, the dose is often based on body weight, set at around 1. This is about — mg for most people, although some studies use up to — mg 1.

Start at a low dose — around — mg — to assess your tolerance. Then increase the dose to or even mg to maintain a performance benefit. Very high doses — 4. If you wish to use caffeine for athletic performance, you should also save it for key events or races to maintain sensitivity to its effects.

For optimal performance, take it about 60 minutes before a race or event. That said, the optimal timing may depend on the form of supplementation. For example, caffeinated chewing gums may be taken closer to the start of a race or event.

Consuming — mg of caffeine 60 minutes before a race or event can help maximize performance benefits. At a sensible dose, caffeine can provide many benefits with few side effects.

However, it may be unsuitable for some people. Here are some common side effects of too much caffeine :. High doses of mg — the amount in about 6 cups of coffee — have been shown to increase tremors and restlessness, especially for people who are not used to caffeine.

People who are prone to anxiety may also want to avoid high doses Those with heart disease, high blood pressure, gastroesophageal reflux disease GERD , and several other conditions, as well as people who are pregnant, should use caution when consuming caffeine and consult their doctor to determine whether caffeine is safe for them.

Timing may also matter, as late-night or evening caffeine can disrupt sleep. Try to avoid caffeine intake after 4 or 5 p. Finally, you could become ill, or even die, if you overdose on extremely high amounts of caffeine. Do not confuse milligrams with grams when using caffeine supplements.

Caffeine is a fairly safe supplement at the recommended doses. It may cause minor side effects in some people and should be used with caution in individuals with heart disease, high blood pressure, GERD, and several other conditions.

Caffeine is one of the most effective exercise supplements available. Studies have shown that caffeine can benefit endurance performance, high intensity exercise, and power sports. However, it seems to benefit trained athletes the most. Both caffeine anhydrous supplements and regular coffee provide performance benefits.

Visceral fat and sleep apnea Cafeine, endurance athletes are always perflrmance search Liver function optimization a boost supplekents energy and performance. Suppleements often than not, caffeine is the Visceral fat and sleep apnea for athletes. But is caffeine truly an ergogenic aid and is it safe? According to American College of Sports Medicine, caffeine may be the most widely used stimulant in the world. It can come in many forms such as coffee, nutrition supplements, tea, soft drinks, energy drinks and chocolate. Caffeine can reach its highest levels in the blood approximately one hour after ingestion.

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  1. Sie haben ins Schwarze getroffen. Mir scheint es der gute Gedanke. Ich bin mit Ihnen einverstanden.

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