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Alpha-lipoic acid for nerve pain

Alpha-lipoic acid for nerve pain

Article Information. There is a Alpha-lipoic acid for nerve pain enrve information Organic wildcrafted products for this request. Alpha-lipoif with your care Alpha-lipoic acid for nerve pain before you start ;ain new neeve of physical activity. Don't pajn these supplements if you take the blood thinner warfarin Jantoven. d 16the efficacy and dose response of oral treatment with ALA on neuropathic symptoms and deficits in patients with symptomatic DSP have not yet been established. Additional research on this topic is needed. You may opt-out of email communications at any time by clicking on the unsubscribe link in the e-mail. Alpha-lipoic acid for nerve pain

Alpha-lipoic acid for nerve pain -

There is no evidence for a specific dose. Always talk with your healthcare provider before taking any supplements. Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should talk with a healthcare provider before taking any supplements.

There are no known food or medicine interactions. If you have diabetes and use ALA, work closely with your healthcare provider and closely keep track of your blood sugar levels.

ALA may reduce the amount of insulin or oral diabetes medicines that are needed. Use it cautiously. Search Encyclopedia. Alpha Lipoic Acid ALA, alpha-lipoic acid, TA, thioctic acid General description Alpha lipoic acid ALA is an antioxidant.

Demonstrated uses ALA is frequently used to treat diabetic neuropathy. Antioxidants that included ALA had mixed effects on altitude sickness. Additional research is needed on ALA alone. Early research shows mixed results regarding ALA for brain protection. Additional research on this topic is needed.

ALA may increase the production of glutathione and help repair cell damage. Most studies support the antioxidant effects of ALA. Additional research is needed in this area. Overall evidence of ALA for improving bone mineral density is lacking, although ALA has increased density in a specific hip bone.

Further research is needed. Early research suggests that alpha-lipoic acid with other antioxidants may improve weight loss from cancer. Studies evaluating ALA alone are needed.

Overall evidence of ALA for preventing cancer progression is currently lacking. Early research suggests that ALA and gamma-linolenic acid may benefit symptoms of carpal tunnel syndrome, particularly in the early stages of the disease. Additional research evaluating ALA alone is needed. ALA has been studied as a treatment for cognitive impairment problems with mental function caused by nerve damage in HIV patients.

More high-quality studies are needed. ALA may protect the eye from excess pressure, but more research is needed to evaluate ALA's long-term effect. In early research, ALA and other antioxidants had mixed effects on blood pressure.

The effects of ALA alone are unclear, and further research is needed. Antioxidants that included ALA improved some measurements of blood flow. Further research is needed on ALA alone.

Early research shows that antioxidants, including ALA, may benefit people undergoing cardiac surgery. In people with impaired glucose tolerance, ALA had mixed results in improving insulin levels and the insulin response.

Further research is needed on this topic. In HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy, ALA improved white blood cell function. ALA has shown mixed results for improving blood flow. The effects of ALA on inflammation markers are unclear. Ischemia-reperfusion injury protection prevention of tissue damage after restored blood flow.

ALA may prevent tissue damage after restored blood flow in the liver. ALA may improve the blood vessel lining function, possibly benefiting patients with end-stage kidney disease.

More research is needed in this area. Research investigating the effect of ALA for mitochondrial diseases problems with cell energy is limited.

Further research is required. ALA has shown mixed results as a treatment for burning mouth syndrome, a condition that causes the mouth to feel hot or tingly.

Additional research is needed. ALA may reduce pain associated with exercise in people with peripheral artery disease. Additional studies are warranted. Limited research suggests that ALA may be beneficial for people exposed to high levels of radiation.

Well-designed studies are needed. Early research suggests that ALA acid lacks effects on symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory mediators.

Early research suggests that ALA may reduce some adverse effects of antipsychotic drugs. Additional high-quality studies are needed. The antioxidant effects of ALA may aid recovery of nerve function and pain reduction.

Early research shows that a skin cream with ALA may help improve signs of skin aging. Antioxidants with ALA may improve the effectiveness of treatment for skin pigmentation. ALA may reduce liver size and reduce other symptoms of a fatty liver.

More well-designed studies are needed. Research suggests ALA may reduce weight gain associated with use of antipsychotic drugs. ALA may reduce tissue damage caused by long-term exposure to high levels of oxygen. ALA has been studied as a treatment for alcohol-related liver disease.

However, benefits have not been observed at this time. For alcoholic liver disease, milligrams of ALA has been taken by mouth in three divided doses daily for up to 24 weeks. As an antioxidant, , milligrams of ALA has been taken by mouth daily for four weeks to six months.

Additionally, , milligrams of ALA has been taken by mouth in two or three divided doses for days. For cognitive function associated with HIV, milligrams of ALA has been taken by mouth twice daily for 10 weeks. For glaucoma damaged optic nerve , milligrams of ALA taken by mouth for one month showed improvement over 75 milligrams of ALA taken by mouth for two months.

For HIV patients on antiretroviral therapy, milligrams of ALA has been taken by mouth three times daily for six months. For impaired glucose tolerance, milliliters of saline solution containing milligrams of ALA was injected once daily for up to three weeks. Additionally, milliliters of saline containing milligrams of ALA has been used as a single dose.

For improving blood flow, , milligrams of ALA has been taken by mouth. Additionally, milligrams of ALA in milliliters of saline has been injected for up to three weeks.

For lipid lowering effects, milligrams of ALA has been taken by mouth daily for up to16 weeks. A dosage of milligrams was also taken by mouth daily for four weeks.

A dosage of milligrams of ALA in milliliters of saline has been injected into a vein daily for 14 days. For neuropathy nerve damage , , milligrams of ALA has been taken by mouth daily in divided doses from 19 days to four years.

A dose of , milligrams of ALA has been injected into a vein for up to four weeks. For pain burning mouth syndrome , milligrams of ALA has been taken by mouth daily for up to three months.

For peripheral artery disease, milligrams of ALA has been taken by mouth daily in two divided doses for three months. For prevention of tissue damage after restored blood flow, milligrams of ALA in 50 milliliters of sodium chloride has been injected into a vein.

For rheumatoid arthritis, milligrams of ALA has been taken by mouth three times daily for 12 weeks. For sciatica pain from compressed nerve , milligrams of ALA has been taken by mouth daily for 60 days.

For steatohepatitis fatty liver , milligrams of ALA has been taken by mouth twice or thrice daily for months. Like most nutritional supplements, ALA should be stored in a cool, dry place. Since ALA is not an essential nutrient, there is no recommended amount to get in your diet or through supplements.

There also is no set upper intake limit. If you take too much ALA, you may experience some of the side effects discussed above, but they tend to resolve when the supplement is stopped. Some studies have found that taking large amounts of ALA can be dangerous. In one reported case, a year-old woman experienced multiple organ failures from too much ALA.

In another, accidental exposure to ALA caused a toddler to experience convulsions. In a third case, a year-old woman experienced tachycardia or a rapid heartbeat, altered mental state, and metabolic acidosis after an intentional overdose of ALA.

It is essential to carefully read the ingredient list and nutrition facts panel to know which ingredients and how much of each ingredient is included. Review this supplement label with a healthcare provider to discuss any potential interactions with foods, other supplements, and medications.

Alpha-lipoic acid is a fatty acid found naturally inside every cell of the human body. Its primary role is to convert blood sugar glucose into energy using oxygen.

Many people use it to help with diabetes, nerve pain, weight loss, heart disease, and primary mitochondrial disorders. Side effects of using ALA appear mild and, when they're not, seem to be caused by taking too much.

Like other supplements, ALA is capable of interacting with other medications. Thus, it's crucial that a healthcare provider understands your full health picture before offering a verdict on whether you can safely use ALA. ALA may help to manage blood sugar associated with diabetes and ease neuropathy pain.

There is less evidence that it helps with weight loss. There is no evidence to confirm that ALA can help you sleep. In fact, insomnia can be a side effect of the supplement. However, ALA may reduce pain from neuropathy, which may help some people sleep better.

ALA has anti-inflammatory properties. However, it does not work in the same way as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. It may help to reduce systemic inflammation over time, but you will not notice any immediate effects.

An ALA deficiency is practically unheard of. Rare genetic mutations have been described in medical literature in which the body is unable to produce lipoic acid synthase. It is estimated that fewer than one in a million people are affected.

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Alpha-lipoic acid ALA as a supplementation for weight loss: results from a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Obes Rev. Namazi N, Larijani B, Azadbakht L. Alpha-lipoic acid supplement in obesity treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials.

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Esposito C, Ugo Garzarella E, Santarcangelo C, et al. Safety and efficacy of alpha-lipoic acid oral supplementation in the reduction of pain with unknown etiology: a monocentric, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

Viana MDM, Lauria PSS, Lima AA, Opretzka LCF, Marcelino HR, Villarreal CF. Alpha-lipoic acid as an antioxidant strategy for managing neuropathic pain. Antioxidants Basel. Koh EH, Lee WJ, Lee SA, et al. Effects of alpha-lipoic acid on body weight in obese subjects. Am J Med.

Gosselin LE, Chrapowitzky L, Rideout TC. Metabolic effects of α-lipoic acid supplementation in pre-diabetics: a randomized, placebo-controlled pilot study.

Food Funct. Altunina NV, Lizogub VG, Bondarchuk OM. Alpha-lipoic acid as a means of influence on systemic inflammation in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with prior myocardial infarction. J Med Life. National Institutes of Health Office of Dietary Supplements.

Dietary supplements for primary mitochondrial disorders. Sherif S, Bendas ER, Badawy S. The clinical efficacy of cosmeceutical application of liquid crystalline nanostructured dispersions of alpha lipoic acid as anti-wrinkle.

Eur J Pharm Biopharm. Shinto L, Quinn J, Montine T, et al. A randomized placebo-controlled pilot trial of omega-3 fatty acids and alpha lipoic acid in Alzheimer's disease.

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Alpha-lipoic acid for nerve pain ZieglerAlexander NdrveRor Barinov acis, Peter J. Dyck Alpha-lipoid, Irina GurievaPhillip A. LowUllrich MunzelNikolai YakhnoItamar RazGarlic for respiratory wellness NovosadovaJoachim Maus pai, Rustem Samigullin; Painn Alpha-lipoic acid for nerve pain With α-Lipoic Acid Improves Symptomatic Diabetic Polyneuropathy : The SYDNEY 2 trial. Diabetes Care 1 November ; 29 11 : — OBJECTIVE —The aim of this trial was to evaluate the effects of α-lipoic acid ALA on positive sensory symptoms and neuropathic deficits in diabetic patients with distal symmetric polyneuropathy DSP. The primary outcome measure was the change from baseline of the Total Symptom Score TSSincluding stabbing pain, burning pain, paresthesia, and asleep numbness of the feet. Alpha-lipoic acid is paiin antioxidant made Alpha-lipoic acid for nerve pain the Alpha-lipiic. It is found in every cell, where it ror turn glucose into energy. Antioxidants attack "free radicals," waste products created when the body turns food into energy. Free radicals cause harmful chemical reactions that can damage cells, making it harder for the body to fight off infections. They also damage organs and tissues.

Alpha-lipoic acid for nerve pain -

ALA is frequently used to treat diabetic neuropathy. This is a sensory change that includes stinging, burning, pain, and numbness in parts of the skin. ALA hasn't been scientifically proven to be helpful in all cases of neuropathy. However, some studies have indicated its helpfulness in mild to moderate cases.

It is used by many people with neuropathy. Research continues to be in progress to evaluate ALA's effectiveness. Several small studies have also shown that ALA can help to increase insulin sensitivity.

It may lower blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. More research is needed to confirm this. ALA is a strong antioxidant. This function may protect nerve tissue from damage.

Conditions, such as diabetes, may be helped by antioxidants such as ALA. There is no evidence for a specific dose. Always talk with your healthcare provider before taking any supplements.

Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should talk with a healthcare provider before taking any supplements. Side effects may include dry mouth, less appetite, trouble sleeping, headache and agitation. Acetyl-L-carnitine supplements can affect certain medicines. Don't use these supplements if you take the blood thinner warfarin Jantoven.

Acetyl-L-carnitine can increase the effects of this medicine. That can raise the risk of bleeding. Also, don't use acetyl-L-carnitine if you take thyroid hormone medicine for hypothyroidism.

The supplement might affect how well the thyroid medicine works. Acetyl-L-carnitine supplements also might make some conditions worse, such as bipolar disorder. And if you've had seizures in the past, acetyl-L-carnitine may raise the risk for more seizures.

Research into the relationship between dietary supplements and diabetic neuropathy is ongoing. In the meantime, focus on eating a balanced diet. Aim for a nutritious eating plan that's low in fat and calories. Healthy meal plans focus on:. Exercise also is a key part of managing blood sugar.

Check with your care team before you start a new type of physical activity. This is especially important if you take medicines that lower your blood sugar. These include insulin, and sulfonylureas such as glimepiride Amaryl and glipizide Glucotrol XL. Aim to work up to at least minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic activity each week.

For example, you could take a brisk walk for about 30 minutes on most days of the week. Also aim to do 2 to 3 muscle-strengthening workouts a week. Drink water before, during and after exercise to prevent dehydration. And be sure to wear comfortable, supportive shoes. There is a problem with information submitted for this request.

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Request Appointment. Diabetic neuropathy: Can dietary supplements help? Products and services. Thank you for subscribing! Sorry something went wrong with your subscription Please, try again in a couple of minutes Retry. Show references Diabetic neuropathy. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases.

Accessed Dec. Diabetes and dietary supplements: What you need to know. National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health. Steps to prevent or delay nerve damage.

American Diabetes Association. Vitamin B Fact sheet for health professionals. Office of Dietary Supplements. Halabi Z, et al. Alpha lipoic acid toxicity: The first reported mortality in an adult patient after multiorgan failure. Vitamin B Natural Medicines. Diabetes and food: Vitamins and supplements.

Alpha-lipoic acid. Carnitine: Fact sheet for health professionals. Facilitating behavior change and well-being to improve health outcomes. Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes— Diabetes Care. Feldman EL. Management of diabetic neuropathy.

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Lipoic acid often called α-lipoic vorAlpha-lipoic acid for nerve pain known as thioctic acid, is Stress relief through social support naturally occurring organosulfur compound that is synthesized by plants and animals, acd humans 1, 2. Lipoic acid is nwrve bound nervw certain proteinswhich Alpha-lipoic acid for nerve pain pxin part of wcid mitochondrial Alpha-liplic enzyme complexes involved in energy and amino acid metabolism see Biological Activities. In addition to the physiological functions of protein-bound lipoic acid, there is increasing scientific and medical interest in potential therapeutic uses of pharmacological doses of free unbound lipoic acid 3. Lipoic acid contains two thiol sulfur groups, which may be oxidized or reduced ; dihydrolipoic acid is the reduced form of lipoic acid Figure 1 4. Lipoic acid also contains an asymmetric carbon, which means that lipoic acid can exist as one of two possible optical isomersalso called enantiomers.

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