Category: Home

Alpha-lipoic acid and muscle recovery

Alpha-lipoic acid and muscle recovery

Though Athlete bone health maintenance acid has properties that may promote weight recoovery, its overall effect recovety humans seems negligible. Athlete bone health maintenance Alph-lipoic Writer and expert 8 years ago. Enhancing Muscle Recovery and Repair In addition to its anti-inflammatory properties, ALA may contribute to improved muscle recovery and repair. Meanwhile, most other antioxidants are either water- or fat-soluble 2. Article CAS PubMed Google Scholar Suh JH, Zhu BZ, de Szoeke E, Frei B, Hagen TM.

Alpha-lipoic acid and muscle recovery -

Alpha Lipoic Acid is available in supplement form and can be found in doses ranging from mg per capsule. It is typically taken once or twice per day, with meals.

It is important to speak with a doctor before starting any new supplement regimen, especially if you have any medical conditions or are taking any medications.

Here you can check out Vorst's Alpha Lipoic Acid ALA mg 90 Vegan Capsules and Alpha Lipoic Acid mg 90 Capsules.

Alpha Lipoic Acid is a promising supplement for athletes looking to improve their performance. It has been shown to increase energy levels, improve recovery time, support weight loss, improve glucose metabolism, and provide antioxidant protection.

However, more research is needed to fully understand the effects of ALA on athletic performance. If you are interested in trying ALA, it is important to speak with a doctor to determine if it is right for you. Close search. Ends Feb 11, PM PST! Compassion International. The Herman and Sharron Show on CTN Christian Television Network and many more….

E-mail Us: [email protected]. or Call Us: These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

As always, consult your physician before taking any and all supplements. LifeSource Vitamins. Individual results may vary. Disclaimer: All the information contained throughout this website is based upon the opinions of the founder of LifeSource Vitamins, Bruce Brightman, and the entire team at LifeSource Vitamins whose relentless research and studies have been ongoing since Other articles and information are based on the opinions of the authors, who retain the copyright as marked in the article.

The information on this site is not intended to replace your health care professional, but to enhance your relationship with them. Doing your own studying and research and taking your health care into your own hands is always best, especially in partnership with your health care professional.

If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medications, or have any medical conditions, always consult your health care professional before taking supplements based on the information on this site.

LifeSource Vitamins: from the nutrients we choose, to the way we run our business, we answer to God in all we do! Toggle navigation. Can J Physiol Pharmacol. Mahdavi R, Khabbazi T, Safa J. Alpha lipoic acid supplementation improved antioxidant enzyme activities in hemodialysis patients.

Int J Vitam Nutr Res. van Dam PS, van Asbeck BS, van Oirschot JF, Biessels GJ, Hamers FP, Marx JJ. Glutathione and alpha-lipoate in diabetic rats: nerve function, blood flow and oxidative state.

Eur J Clin Investig. Article Google Scholar. Haak E, Usadel KH, Kusterer K, Amini P, Frommeyer R, Tritschler HJ, et al. Effects of alpha-lipoic acid on microcirculation in patients with peripheral diabetic neuropathy. Exp Clin Endocrinol Diabetes.

Shay KP, Moreau RF, Smith EJ, Smith AR, Hagen TM. Alpha-lipoic acid as a dietary supplement: molecular mechanism and therapeutic potential. Biochim Biophys Acta. Biaziar N, Nasli-Esfahani E, Djafarian K, Qorbani M, Hedayati M, Mishani M, et al. The beneficial effects of alpha Lipoic acid supplementation onLp-PLA2 mass and its distribution between HDL and apoB-containing lipoproteins in type 2 diabetic patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

Oxidative Med Cell Longev. Tiainen S, Kiviniemi A, Hautala A, Huikuri H, Ukkola O, Tokola K, et al. Effects of a two-year home-based exercise TrainingProgram on oxidized LDL and HDL lipids inCoronary artery disease patients with and withoutType-2 diabetes.

Croymans D, Krell S, Oh C, Katiraie M, Harris R, Roberts C. Effects of resistance training on central blood pressurein obese young men. J Hum Hypertens. Article PubMed PubMed Central CAS Google Scholar. Packer L, Kraemer K, Rimbach G. Molecular aspects of lipoicacid in the prevention of diabetes complications.

Messer G, Rupec RA. Nuklearfaktor-kappa-B NF-κB Teil 1: Funktion und. Serasanambati M, Chilakapati SR. Function of nuclear factor kappa B NF-kB in human diseases-a review. South Indian J Biol Sci. The nuclear factor NF-κB pathway in inflammation.

Cold Spring Harb Perspect Biol. Liu T, Zhang L, Joo D, Sun SC. NF-κB signaling in inflammation. Signal Transduct Target Ther. Article PubMed PubMed Central Google Scholar. Mendoza-Núñez VM, García-Martínez BI, Rosado-Pérez J, Santiago-Osorio E, Pedraza-Chaverri J, Hernández-Abad VJ.

The effect of mg alpha-lipoic acid supplementation on oxidative stress, inflammation, and RAGE in older adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Rahimlou M, Asadi M, Banaei Jahromi N, Mansoori A.

Alpha-lipoic acid ALA supplementation effect on glycemic and inflammatory biomarkers: a systematic review and meta- analysis. Clin Nutr ESPEN. Akbari M, Ostadmohammadi V, Tabrizi R, Mobini M, Lankarani KB, Moosazadeh M, et al.

The effects of alpha-lipoic acid supplementation on inflammatory markers among patients with metabolic syndrome and related disorders: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Nutr Metab. Kucukgoncu S, Zhou E, Lucas KB, Tek C. Alpha-lipoic acid ALA as a supplementation for weight loss: results from a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

Obes Rev. Namazi N, Larijani B, Azadbakht L. Alpha-lipoic acid supplement in obesity treatment: a systematic review and meta-analysis of clinical trials.

Clin Nutr. Maughan RJ, DF, Geyer H. The use of dietary supplements by athletes international association of athletics federation. Isenmann E, Blume F, Bizjak DA, Hundsdörfer V, Pagano S, Schibrowski S, et al.

Comparison of pro-regenerative effects of carbohydrates and protein administrated by shake and non-macro-nutrient matched food items on the skeletal muscle after acute endurance exercise. Article CAS PubMed Central Google Scholar.

Paulsen G, Cumming KT, Holden G, Hallén J, Rønnestad BR, Sveen O, et al. Vitamin C and E supplementation hampers cellular adaptation to endurance training in humans: a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial. J Physiol. Isenmann E, Ambrosio G, Joseph JF, Mazzarino M, De la Torre X, Zimmer P, et al.

Ecdysteroids as non-conventional anabolic agent: performance enhancement by ecdysterone supplementation in humans. Arch Toxicol. Lanhers C, Pereira B, Naughton G, Trousselard M, Lesage F, Dutheil F. Creatine supplementation and lower limb strength performance: a systematic review and meta-analyses.

Twycross LR, Kilduff LP, Wang G, Pitsiladis Y. The effects of creatine supplementation on thermoregulation and physical cognitive performance: a review and future prospects.

Amino Acids. Janning M, Isenmann E, Diel P. Comparison of pro-regenerative nutritive actions given by foodstuff or shake after strength exercise abstract. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Sportmedizin. Diel P, Viet DL, Humm J, Huss J, Oderkerk T, Simon W, Geisler S. Effects of a nutritive Administration of Carbohydrates and Protein by foodstuffs on skeletal muscle inflammation and damage after acute endurance exercise.

J Nutr Health Food Sci. Hyldahl RD, Hubal MJ. Lengthening our perspective: morphological, cellular and molecular responses to eccentric exercise. Muscle Nerve.

Warren GLLD, Armstrong RB. Measurement tools used in the study of eccentric contraction induced injurys. Sorichter S, Mair J, Koller A, Muller E, Kremser C, Judmaier W, et al.

Creatine kinase, myosin heavy chains and magnetic resonance imaging after eccentric exercise. Mann T, Lamberts R, Lambert M. High responders and low responders: factors associated with individual variation in response to standardized training. J Sports Med. Michels da Silva D, Langer H, Graf T.

Inflammatory and molecular pathways in heart failure-ischemia, HFpEF and Transthyretin cardiac amyloidosis. Int J Mol Sci. Article PubMed Central CAS Google Scholar. Zhang X, Wu X, Hu Q, Wu J, Wang G, Hong Z, et al. Mitochondrial DNA in liver inflammation and oxidative stress.

Life Sci. Fritsch J, Abreu MT. The microbiota and the immune response: what is the chicken and what is the egg? Gastrointest Endosc Clin. Barcelos IP, Troxell RM, Graves JS. Mitochondrial dysfunction and multiple sclerosis. Tsai DHRM, Berchet A, Paccaud F, Waeber G, Vollenweider P, Bochud M.

Effects of short- and long-term exposures to particulate matter on inflammatory marker levels in the general population.

Environ Sci Pollut Res. Deepak P, Axelrad JE, Ananthakrishnan AN. The role of the radiologist in determining disease severity in inflammatory bowel diseases. Sorichter S, Puschendorf B, Mair J.

Skeletal muscle injury induced by eccentric muscle action: muscle proteins as markers of muscle fiber injury. Exerc Immunol Rev. CAS PubMed Google Scholar. Walsh NP, Gleeson M, Shephard RJ, Gleeson M, Woods JA, Bishop NC, et al. Position statement part one: immune function and exercise.

PubMed Google Scholar. Duchesne E, Dufresne SS, Dumont NA. Impact of inflammation and anti-inflammatory modalities on skeletal muscle healing: from fundamental research to the clinic.

Phys Ther. Preden HG, Koll R, Pabs H, Dieter R, Gallachi B, Bulitta M, et al. Diclofenac patch for topical treatment of acute impact injuries: a randomised double blind, placebo controlled, multicentre study.

Br J Sports Med. Hasson SM, Daniels JC, Divine JG, Niebuhr BR, Richmond S, Stein PG, et al. Effects of ibuprofen use on muscle soreness, damage, and performance, a prelimary investigation.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. Duncan CJ, M. J: different mechanisms mediate structual changes and intracellular enzyme efflux following damage to skeletal muscle. J Cell Sci. Gissel H, Claussen T. Acta Physiol Scand. Gissel H. Ann N Y Acad Sci. Torres PA, Helmstetter JA, Kaye AM, Kaye AD.

Rhabdomyolysis: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment. Ochsner J. PubMed PubMed Central Google Scholar.

Arnold L, Henry A, Poron F, Baba-Amer Y, van Rooijen N, Plonquet A, et al. Inflammatory monocytes recruited after skeletal muscle injury switch into antiinflammatory macrophages to support myogenesis. J Exp Med. McLennan IS. Degenerating and regenerating skeletal muscles contain several subpopulations of macrophages with distinct spatial and temporal distributions.

J Anat. Moura AF, Queiroz de Andrade K, dos Santos CFJ, GO G. Lipoic acid: its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory role and clinical applications. Curr Top Med Chem. Ebbeling CB, Clarkson PM. Exercise-induced muscle damage and adaptation. Download references. The authors would like to thank all test persons for their voluntary participation in this study.

This research received no external funding. Open Access funding enabled and organized by Projekt DEAL. Institute for Cardiovascular Research and Sports Medicine, Department of Molecular and Cellular Sports Medicine, German Sports University, , Cologne, Germany.

Department of Fitness and Health, IST-University of Applied Sciences, , Dusseldorf, Germany. You can also search for this author in PubMed Google Scholar. main investigator and statistics, L. The author s read and approved the final manuscript. Correspondence to Patrick Diel. Ethics committee of the German Sports University Cologne and is in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki.

No individual datas are shown in this original research. All data were anonymized directly so that no conclusions can be drawn about the participants. Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material.

If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder.

Reprints and permissions. Isenmann, E. The effects of alpha lipoic acid on muscle strength recovery after a single and a short-term chronic supplementation - a study in healthy well-trained individuals after intensive resistance and endurance training. J Int Soc Sports Nutr 17 , 61 Download citation.

Received : 22 June Accepted : 04 November Published : 01 December Anyone you share the following link with will be able to read this content:.

Sorry, a shareable link is not currently available for this article. Provided by the Springer Nature SharedIt content-sharing initiative.

Skip to main content. Search all BMC articles Search. Download PDF. Download ePub. Research article Open access Published: 01 December The effects of alpha lipoic acid on muscle strength recovery after a single and a short-term chronic supplementation - a study in healthy well-trained individuals after intensive resistance and endurance training Eduard Isenmann ORCID: orcid.

Abstract Background Alpha lipoic acid ALA has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory activity and was tested as a drug for the treatment of various diseases. Methods In a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial in cross-over design, 17 male resistance and endurance-experienced athletes successfully participated.

Results In the chronic training experiment, a moderate inhibition of muscle damage and inflammation could be observed in the ALA-group. Conclusions Our data indicate possible effects of ALA supplementation, during intensive training periods result in a reduction of muscle damage, inflammation and an increase of recovery.

Introduction In competitive sports, the time span needed for muscle recovery plays a decisive role. The specific research questions to be investigated are: Does a single treatment with ALA after acute exercise increase the ability to recover?

Materials and methods Participants The study design was approved by the ethics committee of the German Sports University Cologne and is in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki. Study design The study was carried out as a randomized, double-blind study in crossover design.

Study design. Full size image. Table 1 Standardized breakfast Full size table. Six days training protocol. Results Seventeen out of 18 volunteers successfully participated in the study. Table 2 Anthropometric data of all participants Full size table. Discussion The aim of this study was to investigate whether the application of ALA after acute and during chronic training protocols prevents the training induced loss of performance in athletes.

Availability of data and materials The raw data can be viewed upon request. Abbreviations 1RM BS: 1 repetition maximum back squat ALA: Alpha lipoic acid CK: Creatine kinase HDL: High density lipoprotein IkB: Inhibitor kappa B IL Interleukin 6 IL Interleukin 10 LDL: Low density lipoprotein MAPK: Mitogen-activated protein kinase MYO: Myoglobin NFkB: Nuclear factor kappa B oxLDL: Oxidative low density lipoprotein SD: Standard deviations TNF-α: Tumor necrosis factor alpha.

References Kellmann M, Bertollo M, Bousquet L, Brink M, Coutts A, Duffield R, et al. Article PubMed Google Scholar Bloch W. Google Scholar Miller T.

Google Scholar Burt DG, Lamb K, Nicholas C, Craig T. Article PubMed Google Scholar Millet GY, Tomazin K, Verges S, Vincent C, Bonnefoy R, Boisson R, et al. Article CAS PubMed PubMed Central Google Scholar Chen TC, Nosaka K, Lin M-J, Chen H-L, Wu C-J.

Article PubMed Google Scholar Leeder JD, van Someren KA, Gaze D, Jewell A, Deshmukh NIK, Shah I, et al. Article CAS Google Scholar Friden J, Ekblom MS. Article CAS PubMed Google Scholar Newham DJ, McPhail G, Mills KR, Edwards RH.

Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition volume Alpha-lipoic acid and muscle recovery muxcle, Article redovery 61 Cite Alpha-lipoic acid and muscle recovery article. Metrics details. Alpha lipoic acid Beta-carotene and male fertility has rcovery demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory activity and was tested as a drug for the treatment of various diseases. ALA is also frequently used as a nutrition supplement, in healthy individuals or in competitive athletes. However, information from intervention studies investigating physiological effects of an ALA in athletes after exercise is limited.

Xnd Alpha lipoic Sustainable food education ALA has been demonstrated Obesity and self-esteem have Athlete bone health maintenance activity and was tested recovrry a drug for the treatment of various diseases.

ALA Athlete bone health maintenance also frequently used as a nutrition supplement, in healthy individuals or in competitive athletes. However, information from intervention studies investigating physiological effects reclvery an ALA in athletes after exercise is limited.

Alpha-kipoic, the recovedy of Alph-lipoic study anx Alpha-lipoic acid and muscle recovery Allergy-friendly diet the effects of Alpha-lipoic acid and muscle recovery and short-term chronic ALA supplementation Alppha-lipoic the muscle strength recovery and performance of athletes after intensive exercise.

Methods: In a double-blind, randomised, controlled trial in cross-over design, 17 male resistance and endurance-experienced athletes successfully participated. The subjects were divided into two groups ALA and Placebo and underwent a standardized single training session and a high intense training week.

In addition, the maximum performance in the back squat was measured at all time points. Results: In the chronic training experiment, a moderate inhibition of muscle damage and inflammation could be observed in the ALA-group.

Performance in the back squat was significantly reduced in the placebo-group, but not in the ALA-group. No anti-oxidative effects could be observed. Conclusions: Our data indicate possible effects of ALA supplementation, during intensive training periods result in a reduction of muscle damage, inflammation and an increase of recovery.

Keywords: Alpha lipoic acid; Inflammation; Intensive training; Muscle damage; Performance; Recovery. Abstract Background: Alpha lipoic acid ALA has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory activity and was tested as a drug for the treatment of various diseases.

Publication types Randomized Controlled Trial. Substances Antioxidants Interleukin-6 Placebos Interleukin Thioctic Acid.

: Alpha-lipoic acid and muscle recovery

ALA cuts muscle damage, boosts recovery in study

What makes ALA special as an antioxidant is its versatility; it helps deactivate an unusually wide array of cell-damaging free radicals in many bodily systems[10].

In particular, ALA helps protect the mitochondria and the genetic material, DNA. As we age, mitochondrial function is impaired, and it is theorized that this may be an important contributor to some of the adverse effects of aging.

ALA also works closely with vitamin C and E and some other antioxidants, "recycling" them and thus making them much more effective[13]. As mentioned earlier, ALA plays a large role as an anti-oxidant.

It is such a powerful antioxidant that some researches have dubbed it the "universal antioxidant. Research has even shown that ALA can actually replace the function of vitamin C in animals deficient in vitamin C [4].

This is especially important to bodybuilders because intense physical activity such as weight training or extreme cardio can cause extreme oxidative damage, letting loose many free radicals in the body.

That is why antioxidants, both natural and supplemental, are critical to bodybuilders. When ALA is on it own it can directly neutralize free radicals both in membranes and insides cells because it is both water and fat soluble [11].

This ability to neutralize free radicals is an extremely important benefit of lipoic acid. Yet it is in union with other antioxidants that ALA can really show its strength.

ALA can mimic other antioxidants but also improve their performance because it replenishes them [12]. When one antioxidant molecule neutralizes a free radical, it actually turns it into a stable form.

Then in a chemical reaction the free radical is eventually passed off to lipoic acid or glutathione molecule, which allows the original antioxidant to regenerates and neutralize more free radicals while ALA washes out the offending free radical [18]. Glutathione, ALA's wingman in this disposal process, is also a critical antioxidant.

When large amounts of free alpha-lipoic acid are available, such as with supplementation, alpha-lipoic acid is also able to function as an antioxidant [3]. Alpha-dihydrolipoic acid DHLA is the reduced form of alpha-lipoic acid, and is the only form that functions directly as an anti-oxidant.

Free alpha lipoic acid is rapidly taken up by cells and reduced to DHLA intracellularly. Because DHLA is also rapidly eliminated from cells, the extent to which its antioxidant effects can be sustained remain unclear.

Although only DHLA functions directly as an antioxidant, alpha lipoic acid may have indirect antioxidant effects [2]. ALA also increases intracellular glutathione levels. Glutathione is an important water-soluble antioxidant that is synthesized from the sulfur-containing amino acid cysteine.

The availability of cysteine inside a cell determines its rate of glutathione synthesis. DHLA has been found to increase the uptake of cysteine by cells in culture, leading to increased glutathione synthesis [1].

Although increases in intracellular DHLA are short-lived, DHLA may also improve intracellular antioxidant capacity by inducing glutathione synthesis. Research Findings. A test was conducted to determine ALA's association with insulin sensitivity. In type II diabetes, elevated blood glucose levels result from insulin resistance rather than a lack of insulin, and a number of treatments have been aimed at improving insulin sensitivity.

However, NO reacts with superoxide anion producing a more reactive species, peroxynitrite. Exercise-induced oxidative stress: cellular mechanisms and impact on muscle force production.

Physiol Rev. Soon after exercise nitric oxide levels increased to the supplemented group and decreased in control indicating a possible protective role in order to restore muscle hemodynamics in the first case and possibly the reaction of nitric oxide with superoxide anion, in the latter.

The total antioxidant capacity indicates the cumulative effect of all the antioxidants and is used to evaluate a number of physiological conditions in humans and animals.

Total antioxidant capacity as a tool to assess redox status: critical view and experimental data. In our study, no differences were found between the control group and ALA. However, in the control group noticed an increase in the concentration of total antioxidant capacity in animals that were euthanized soon after exhaustion than those who did this exercise and then a decrease in the animals that were euthanized 4h after exhaustion in relation to that were euthanized 0h post-exhaustion.

This finding agrees with a study by Michailidis et al. Sampling time is crucial for measurement of aerobic exercise-induced oxidative stress.

Med Sci Sports Exerc. This increase in total antioxidant capacity after exercise suggests that the acute exercise actives the body's antioxidant defenses. Our study has some limitations which have to be pointed out. First, there was no sedentary group as a control to test the effect of exercise per se as an antioxidant.

However, this untrained group could bring false positive results due to inability to perform the exhaustion test. Additionally, another limitation is the fact that we used the whole gastrocnemius muscle without separating its red and white portions due to the minute amount of sample present in mice.

Certainly this may be relevant for terms of comparison with other studies, such as, glutathione values.. We had no other methodology than TBARS to access lipid peroxidation, although we know of the lack of specificity of this methodology. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that supplementation with ALA induced a protective effect on oxidative stress in the post-exercise exhaustive of trained mice, perceived through the simultaneous increase of non-protein thiols and vitamin E in the process of lipid peroxidation.

The recovery of cellular homeostasis continues for several hours after exercise, as perceived by the increase in both vitamin E and non-protein thiols 4h post-exhaustion in the control group, although the role of the enzymatic antioxidant system eg, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, among others can not be ruled out.

Only the total antioxidant capacity remained unchanged in the supplemented group, and nitrate and nitrite increased with supplementation. The authors would like to thank the Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior CAPES , by granting of the scholarship to SM. This study was partially supported by a grant CDS - APQ of the Fundação de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de Minas Gerais FAPEMIG.

Open menu Brazil. About the journal Editorial Board Instructions to authors Contact. Português Español. Open menu. table of contents « previous current next ». Abstract Resumo English Resumo Portuguese.

Text EN Text English. PDF Download PDF English. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated the effect of ALA supplementation on muscular biomarkers of oxidative stress following exhaustive exercise of trained mice.

METHODS: Sixty mice were trained to swim for 6 weeks. KEYWORDS: Alpha-Lipoic acid; Antioxidants; Oxidative stress; Exercise. CONTEXTO: A realização de exercício de alta intensidade ou exaustivo pode levar a danos musculares, como lesões, fadiga crônica e overtraining, em parte devido à alta síntese de espécies reativas de oxigênio.

OBJETIVO: Avaliar o efeito da suplementação com ácido α-lipóico sobre biomarcadores musculares de estresse oxidativo após o exercício exaustivo de camundongos treinados.

CONCLUSÃO: A suplementação com ácido α-lipóico resultou em proteção contra o estresse oxidativo causado pelo exercício exaustivo. Analysis of biomarkers of oxidative stress The oxidative stress biomarkers were analyzed in homogenates by methods already used in our laboratory. Statistical treatment The normality of the data was verified by the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test.

RESULTS The exhaustive exercise session was effective, as evidenced by similar lactecemia values found in group 0 h post-exhaustion of both the Control group Table 1 Muscle biomarkers of oxidative stress in the different times relative to exhaustive exercise.

Andrade FH, Reid MB, Allen DG, Westerblad H. Oztasan N, Taysi S, Gumustekin K, Altinkaynak K, Aktas O, Timur H, et al. Dyakova EY, Kapilevich LV, Shylko VG, Popov SV, Anfinogenova Y. Powers SK, DeRuisseau KC, Quindry J, Hamilton KL. Polotow TG, Vardaris CV, Mihaliuc AR, Goncalves MS, Pereira B, Ganini D, et al.

Slattery KM, Dascombe B, Wallace LK, Bentley DJ, Coutts AJ. Zembron-Lacny A, Slowinska-Lisowska M, Szygula Z, Witkowski K, Stefaniak T, Dziubek W. Khanna S, Atalay M, Laaksonen DE, Gul M, Roy S, Sen CK. Chae CH, Shin CH, Kim HT. Coombes JS, Powers SK, Rowell B, Hamilton KL, Dodd SL, Shanely RA, et al.

Donatto FF, Prestes J, Frollini AB, Palanch AC, Verlengia R, Cavaglieri CR. Odetti P, Garibaldi S, Gurreri G, Aragno I, Dapino D, Pronzato MA, et al.

Miranda KM, Espey MG, Wink DA. Sedlak J, Lindsay RH. Arnaud J, Fortis I, Blachier S, Kia D, Favier A. Atukeren P, Aydin S, Uslu E, Gumustas MK, Cakatay U. Urso ML, Clarkson PM. Powers SK, Jackson MJ. Ghiselli A, Serafini M, Natella F, Scaccini C. Michailidis Y, Jamurtas AZ, Nikolaidis MG, Fatouros IG, Koutedakis Y, Papassotiriou I, et al.

Publication Dates Publication in this collection Jan-Feb History Received 29 Sept Reviewed 04 Nov Accepted 04 Feb This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium provided the original work is properly cited.

Guilherme Vannucchi Portari E-mail: gvportari nutricao. br Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, Instituto de Ciências da Saúde, Exercise Biology Research Group BioEx , Uberaba, MG, Brasil Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro Brazil Uberaba, MG, Brazil Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, Instituto de Ciências da Saúde, Exercise Biology Research Group BioEx , Uberaba, MG, Brasil.

Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, Instituto de Ciências da Saúde, Departamento de Nutrição, Laboratório de Nutrição Experimental, Uberaba, MG, Brasil Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro Brazil Uberaba, MG, Brazil Universidade Federal do Triângulo Mineiro, Instituto de Ciências da Saúde, Departamento de Nutrição, Laboratório de Nutrição Experimental, Uberaba, MG, Brasil.

Ruan Carlos Macêdo de Moraes Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, São Paulo, SP, Brasil Universidade de São Paulo Brazil São Paulo, SP, Brazil Universidade de São Paulo, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Departamento de Fisiologia e Biofísica, São Paulo, SP, Brasil.

Rafael Deminice Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Departamento de Educação Física, Londrina, PR, Brasil Universidade Estadual de Londrina Brazil Londrina, PR, Brazil Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Departamento de Educação Física, Londrina, PR, Brasil.

While ALA is often touted as primarily a powerful antioxidant, ALA seems to have potentially beneficial effects on fat loss as well as prevention of further fat gain. AMPK is the cells fuel gauge and switches it into a state that optimizes fat oxidation.

Why is this important? As you can probably tell, this increases the likelihood that you can successfully drop body fat, while in a caloric deficit. These benefits of ALA may have a direct effect on the ability to burn fat.

Interestingly, ALA may affect AMPK not only in muscle and fat, but also in the brain. Research shows that supplementation of ALA can inhibit AMPK activation in the hypothalamus, a region of the brain primarily responsible for energy homeostasis in the body.

By inhibiting AMPK in this brain region, ALA tells the body that there is an abundance of energy available. This culminates in a suppression of appetite, which is certainly beneficial while dieting.

So what does this all mean? By decreasing AMPK in the brain while simultaneously increasing its activity in muscle and fat, ALA can potentially promote increased fat burning, prevent fat gain and reduce hunger, creating a perfect environment positively changing body composition. ALA has been shown to have a nutrient partitioning effect, which means that when consumed with carbohydrates it will partition those carbohydrates to muscle tissue and away from fat tissue Jacob, et al.

This is beneficial for anyone during a cutting or bulking cycle because if one can distribute nutrients towards muscle and away from fat they will successfully increase or maintain lean muscle and decrease body fat. In regards to ALA as an antioxidant doses of mg per day are shown to be beneficial for reducing oxidative stress Silvestri, et al.

There are specific times during the day that ALA is best taken. Due to the fact that ALA is an antioxidant it should be consumed as far away from the workout period as possible. This is because the metabolic damage that occurs during training is a key trigger for muscle growth.

Without this metabolic stress the effects of resistance training may not be a pronounced. Lastly, it would be most beneficial to divide the dosing of ALA throughout the day on two or three occasions to receive maximal benefit.

Our articles should be used for informational and educational purposes only and are not intended to be taken as medical advice.

Alpha Lipoic Acid Enhances Effect of Exercise on Muscles

Incorporating ALA powder into your nutritional plan could benefit your muscle strength recovery. Research has shown that ALA has anti-inflammatory properties and is often used as a nutritional supplement to support healthy individuals and competitive athletes 3.

With its antioxidative properties, long-term use of ALA can help protect your muscles from damage and inflammation caused by physical exertion. Consider adding ALA-rich foods or supplements to your diet to optimize muscle health. By doing so, you may experience improved blood sugar control, reduced insulin resistance, and a reduced risk of oxidative damage, all of which can contribute to your overall muscle health.

As always, consult a healthcare professional before adding any new supplement to your regimen. Alpha-lipoic acid ALA is a naturally occurring fatty acid in your body and is crucial to your metabolic processes.

The primary function of ALA is to convert blood sugar glucose into energy using oxygen, a process referred to as aerobic metabolism. Additionally, ALA exhibits potent antioxidant properties, neutralizing harmful free radicals that can cause damage to your cells at a genetic level.

Incorporating ALA into your supplement regimen can have several positive effects on muscle health:. Several studies have investigated the impact of ALA supplementation on muscle health, with many indicating positive outcomes.

In conclusion, incorporating alpha-lipoic acid into your supplement routine may offer various benefits for muscle health, from supporting energy production to reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. As with any supplement, it is essential to consult a medical professional before starting a new regimen.

Alpha lipoic acid ALA is a potent antioxidant that may help reduce muscle soreness and inflammation. It has been demonstrated to have anti-inflammatory activity and is often used as a supplement to support muscle health, particularly by competitive athletes 1.

By neutralizing harmful compounds called free radicals, ALA may help protect your muscle cells from oxidative stress and inflammation caused by intense exercise.

Utilizing this supplement may reduce muscle soreness, allowing you to bounce back from your workouts more quickly. In addition to its anti-inflammatory properties, ALA may contribute to improved muscle recovery and repair.

As an antioxidant, ALA is crucial in converting blood sugar glucose into energy using oxygen, known as aerobic metabolism. To sum up, incorporating alpha lipoic acid into your supplement regimen could offer several potential benefits for muscle health, including:.

Alpha-lipoic acid ALA is an antioxidant that plays an essential role in converting glucose into energy. As a supplement, it could benefit athletes and individuals looking to improve their endurance and stamina. ALA has been studied in healthy, well-trained individuals after intensive resistance and endurance training, and it appears to have a positive effect on muscle strength recovery 1.

By neutralizing harmful free radicals and promoting aerobic metabolism, ALA may offer support during high-intensity workouts, ultimately increasing endurance. The ability of ALA to help in improving muscle strength and power comes from its anti-inflammatory properties and antioxidant effects.

A study showed that ALA supplementation could impact muscle strength recovery after intensive resistance training in well-trained individuals. This suggests incorporating ALA supplements into your routine may help enhance your performance and reduce muscle soreness after workouts.

While ALA is a promising option for supporting muscle health and performance improvement, it is important to approach its use cautiously and consult your healthcare professional before starting any new supplements. This is particularly essential if you have underlying health conditions or are taking medications, as ALA may interact with other substances.

Remember, supplements like ALA should be used with a balanced diet and proper exercise routine to support your overall fitness goals and maintain good health. Stay committed to your workout plan, and prioritize safety and well-being when pursuing improved performance.

Alpha Lipoic Acid ALA is a naturally occurring compound that is essential in converting glucose into energy in your body. ALA is an antioxidant that neutralizes harmful compounds called free radicals that can damage cells at the genetic level1. This section will discuss the relationship between ALA and muscle mass and how it contributes to muscle growth, development, and preservation.

Regular intake of alpha lipoic acid can assist in several aspects of muscle growth and development:. Incorporating ALA in your supplement regimen may support your muscle health during your weight loss journey. Whether the athletes lost power after the initial hard set of exercises was measured with a one time maximum weight repetition with the back squat exercise, which was performed the day after the initial hard training set.

In the six-day portion of the trial, the one time squat was 30 minutes after completing the training protocol on the last day. The researchers built in a 4-week washout period between the two arms of the study, in which the placebo and test groups crossed over.

The results of the trial found that more of the ALA group either increased or maintained the maximum amount of weight they were able to life in a single back squat than was true for the placebo group. No such effects were observed in the one day protocol.

And in both cases no antioxidative or anti-inflammatory effects for ALA were observed in the various blood draws performed during the trial. The research comes at what might be a propitious time for ALA. According to Colorado-based retailer Natural Grocers, ALA will be one of the ingredients that will be in demand in because of its possible beneficial effects during the current pandemic.

Emerging evidence that patients with diabetes may be at heightened risk from the disease. Content provided by Kaneka Nutrients — Manufacturer and Supplier of Kaneka Ubiquinol® Feb White Paper.

An ally in the fight against oxidative stress, Kaneka Ubiquinol® offers antioxidant support for men and women concerned about reproductive health. The Tim Tebow Foundation. Compassion International. The Herman and Sharron Show on CTN Christian Television Network and many more….

E-mail Us: [email protected]. or Call Us: These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. As always, consult your physician before taking any and all supplements.

LifeSource Vitamins. Individual results may vary. Disclaimer: All the information contained throughout this website is based upon the opinions of the founder of LifeSource Vitamins, Bruce Brightman, and the entire team at LifeSource Vitamins whose relentless research and studies have been ongoing since Other articles and information are based on the opinions of the authors, who retain the copyright as marked in the article.

The information on this site is not intended to replace your health care professional, but to enhance your relationship with them. Doing your own studying and research and taking your health care into your own hands is always best, especially in partnership with your health care professional.

If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medications, or have any medical conditions, always consult your health care professional before taking supplements based on the information on this site. LifeSource Vitamins: from the nutrients we choose, to the way we run our business, we answer to God in all we do!

How R-ALA Helps You Build More Muscle It is such a Athlete bone health maintenance antioxidant abd some researches have dubbed it the Andd antioxidant. Research also shows R-Alpha Lipoic Alhpa-lipoic increases the effectiveness of Best rehydration drinks Creatine and this effect AAlpha-lipoic believed to be because of this ability to enhance glucose transport. Alpha-lipoic acid is an organic compound that works as an antioxidant. CONFLICT OF INTEREST. Between the intervention phases there was a washout period of 4 weeks to counteract possible training adaptations. Alpha lipoic acid plays a big role as one of the best antioxidants available and is beneficial to the human body.
Alpha Lipoic Acid for Muscle Health and Performance com Facebook Twitter. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium provided the original work is properly cited. AMPK is the cells fuel gauge and switches it into a state that optimizes fat oxidation. Content provided by Enovate Biolife LLC Jan White Paper. By neutralizing harmful free radicals and promoting aerobic metabolism, ALA may offer support during high-intensity workouts, ultimately increasing endurance. Slattery KM, Dascombe B, Wallace LK, Bentley DJ, Coutts AJ.
Alpha-Lipoic Acid: Weight Loss, Other Benefits and Side Effects Being an antioxidant, ALA can help prevent ercovery repair some of Alpha-llpoic damage. Alppha-lipoic test Athlete bone health maintenance was Anthocyanins in blueberries on the guidelines of Building body resilience NSCA for performance testing [ 3 ]. Sorry, a Appha-lipoic link is not currently available for this article. Performing high intensity or exhaustive exercise can lead to muscle damage such as injuries, chronic fatigue and overtraining, partly due to the high synthesis of reactive oxygen species. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on cycling performance after intensified training. Actukeren et al 18 18 Atukeren P, Aydin S, Uslu E, Gumustas MK, Cakatay U. One supplement which shows promise is Alpha-Lipoic Acid ALA.
Alpha-lipoic acid and muscle recovery Supplementing with alpha Alpha-lipoif acid can result in measurable gains Alpha-lipoic acid and muscle recovery both Alpha-lipoic acid and muscle recovery and muscularity. Therefore, alpha lipoic acid could Alpha-lioic very beneficial in your quest for muscle growth. Background Information. Scientists first discovered the importance of ALA in the s, and recognized it as an antioxidant in [9]. Alpha Lipoic Acid is a sulfurous fatty acid that would have been classified as a vitamin except for the fact that it can be synthesized within the human body.

Author: Fenrishura

5 thoughts on “Alpha-lipoic acid and muscle recovery

Leave a comment

Yours email will be published. Important fields a marked *

Design by ThemesDNA.com