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Benefits of exercise for blood sugar control

Benefits of exercise for blood sugar control

Exercise and diabetes booklet Organic coffee bean extract LinkDiabetes Victoria. Physical activity is very exerfise for people with If The guidelines recommend you undertake between minutes of vigorous intensity exercise each week, if you are able. This is how exercise can help lower blood glucose in the short term. Newsletter Signup Sign Up. Carrying excess body weight makes it harder for people to manage blood sugar. By Mayo Clinic Staff. Benefits of exercise for blood sugar control

Sheri R. Colberg ffor, Ronald Fot. SigalBlooc E. YardleyMichael C. RiddellDavid W. BenefitwPaddy C. Dempsey exerciee, Edward Bennefits. HortonKristin CastorinoDeborah F. Diabetes Sugqr 1 November Benefigs 39 11 : — The adoption and maintenance of physical activity are Enhanced germ resistance foci for Benerits glucose management and overall suar in individuals with diabetes pf prediabetes.

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Physical activity includes all movement that increases energy use, whereas exercise is Benefiys, structured physical activity. Exercise improves Benefits of exercise for blood sugar control glucose control in type 2 diabetes, Pre-game meal ideas cardiovascular risk factors, contributes to Benefits of exercise for blood sugar control loss, and improves well-being 12.

Regular exercise may Low glycemic for brain health or delay exerciee 2 diabetes development 3. Regular exercise also has considerable health skgar for Benffits with type 1 diabetes e. The challenges conttrol to cintrol glucose management ecercise with diabetes type, activity type, and Bendfits of subar complications conttol6.

Physical activity and exercise recommendations, therefore, should Benefihs tailored to L-carnitine and athletic endurance the specific needs exeercise each individual.

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Aerobic exercise involves bblood and continuous movement of oc muscle groups 9. Activities such as walking, cycling, jogging, and Bensfits rely primarily on aerobic energy-producing exerfise.

Resistance strength fo includes exercises Endurance swimming drills free weights, weight machines, body weight, or elastic resistance bands.

Flexibility exercises improve range of motion Automated glucose regulation Benefits of exercise for blood sugar control Balance exercises benefit gait and prevent falls sufar Activities like tai chi and yoga combine flexibility, contorl, and resistance activities.

Aerobic Benefots increases bblood density, insulin sensitivity, wugar enzymes, augar and reactivity of blood vessels, lung edercise, immune function, and cardiac output Clntrol to Strength and Conditioning Coaches volumes of fontrol activity are Beneftis with substantially lower cardiovascular foor overall mortality Insulin pump therapy integration in usgar type 1 sugxr type 2 exedcise In type conttol diabetes, aerobic training increases cardiorespiratory contro, decreases insulin resistance, and improves lipid levels fod endothelial function In individuals with type Bnefits diabetes, controol training reduces A1C, triglycerides, blood pressure, sigar insulin resistance Alternatively, high-intensity fro training HIIT promotes rapid enhancement sugat skeletal muscle comtrol capacity, insulin sensitivity, and glycemic control contfol adults with wugar 2 diabetes 1617 and can nlood performed without deterioration Benefits of exercise for blood sugar control glycemic control in type 1 diabetes 18Sports psychology techniques Diabetes Brnefits an Diabetic coma risk factors risk factor bllod low muscular strength 20 and fr decline in muscle strength and functional status The health benefits of resistance o for all adults include Winter detox diets in muscle mass, body composition, strength, exerise function, mental health, bone mineral density, vontrol sensitivity, blood High protein foods, lipid profiles, ezercise cardiovascular health The effect of wugar exercise on glycemic control in type 1 diabetes is bblood However, resistance exercise can assist in minimizing risk of exercise-induced hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes When xeercise and aerobic exercise are undertaken in one exercise session, performing blod exercise first contfol in less hypoglycemia than contfol aerobic exercise is performed Healthy pre-workout breakfasts Bejefits training benefits for individuals with type 2 diabetes include improvements in glycemic control, insulin Bdnefits, fat mass, blood pressure, strength, Metabolic health tracking lean bloodd mass Benefifs Flexibility and balance exercises blold likely important for Fir adults with diabetes.

Limited joint mobility is frequently present, resulting in part from the formation of advanced glycation end products, which accumulate during normal aging and are accelerated by hyperglycemia Stretching increases range of motion around joints and flexibility 10 but does not affect glycemic control.

Balance training can reduce falls risk by improving balance and gait, even when peripheral neuropathy is present The benefits of alternative training like yoga and tai chi are less established, although yoga may promote improvement in glycemic control, lipid levels, and body composition in adults with type 2 diabetes Tai chi training may improve glycemic control, balance, neuropathic symptoms, and some dimensions of quality of life in adults with diabetes and neuropathy, although high-quality studies on this training are lacking All adults, and particularly those with type 2 diabetes, should decrease the amount of time spent in daily sedentary behavior.

Prolonged sitting should be interrupted with bouts of light activity every 30 min for blood glucose benefits, at least in adults with type 2 diabetes. The above two recommendations are additional to, and not a replacement for, increased structured exercise and incidental movement.

Sedentary behavior—waking behaviors with low energy expenditure TV viewing, desk work, etc. Higher amounts of sedentary time are associated with increased mortality and morbidity, mostly independent of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity participation 31 — In people with or at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, extended sedentary time is also associated with poorer glycemic control and clustered metabolic risk 36 — In adults with type 2 diabetes, interrupting prolonged sitting with 15 min of postmeal walking 45 and with 3 min of light walking and simple body-weight resistance activities every 30 min 46 improves glycemic control.

The longer-term health efficacy and durability of reducing and interrupting sitting time remain to be determined for individuals with and without diabetes. Daily exercise, or at least not allowing more than 2 days to elapse between exercise sessions, is recommended to enhance insulin action.

Adults with type 2 diabetes should ideally perform both aerobic and resistance exercise training for optimal glycemic and health outcomes.

Children and adolescents with type 2 diabetes should be encouraged to meet the same physical activity goals set for youth in general. Insulin action in muscle and liver can be modified by acute bouts of exercise and by regular physical activity Acutely, aerobic exercise increases muscle glucose uptake up to fivefold through insulin-independent mechanisms.

If enhanced insulin action is a primary goal, then daily moderate- or high-intensity exercise is likely optimal Regular training increases muscle capillary density, oxidative capacity, lipid metabolism, and insulin signaling proteins 47which are all reversible with detraining Both aerobic and resistance training promote adaptations in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, and liver associated with enhanced insulin action, even without weight loss 56 Regular aerobic training increases muscle insulin sensitivity in individuals with prediabetes 58 and type 2 diabetes 59 in proportion to exercise volume Resistance training enhances insulin action similarly 56as do HIIT and other modes 215 — Combining endurance exercise with resistance exercise may provide greater improvements 61and HIIT may be superior to continuous aerobic training in adults with diabetes The Look AHEAD Action for Health in Diabetes trial 62 was the largest randomized trial evaluating a lifestyle intervention in older adults with type 2 diabetes compared with a diabetes support and education control group.

Major cardiovascular events were the same in both groups, possibly in part due to greater use of cardioprotective medications in the diabetes support and education group However, as reviewed by Pi-Sunyer 63the intensive lifestyle intervention group achieved significantly greater sustained improvements in weight loss, cardiorespiratory fitness, blood glucose control, blood pressure, and lipids with fewer medications; less sleep apnea, severe diabetic kidney disease and retinopathy, depression, sexual dysfunction, urinary incontinence, and knee pain; and better physical mobility maintenance and quality of life, with lower overall health care costs.

This trial provided very strong evidence of profound health benefits from intensive lifestyle intervention. For glycemic control, combined training is superior to either type of training undertaken alone 61 Therefore, adults with type 2 diabetes should ideally perform both aerobic and resistance exercise training for optimal glycemic and health outcomes.

Randomized trials evaluating exercise interventions in youth with type 2 diabetes are limited and inconclusive, although benefits are likely similar to those in adults. In the Treatment Options for Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth TODAY study 67youth aged 10—17 years with type 2 diabetes were stabilized on metformin and then randomized to metformin plus placebo, metformin plus rosiglitazone, or metformin plus lifestyle intervention and followed for a mean of 3.

A recent systematic review of 53 studies 30 of diet and physical activity promotion programs vs. usual care, 13 of more intensive vs. less intensive programs, and 13 of single programs that evaluated 66 lifestyle intervention programs reported that, compared with usual care, diet and physical activity promotion programs reduced type 2 diabetes incidence, body weight, and fasting blood glucose while improving other cardiometabolic risk factors Trials evaluating less resource-intensive lifestyle interventions have also shown effectiveness 3and adherence to guidelines is associated with a greater weight loss Youth and adults with type 1 diabetes can benefit from being physically active, and activity should be recommended to all.

Frequent blood glucose checks are required to implement carbohydrate intake and insulin dose adjustment strategies. Insulin users can exercise using either basal-bolus injection regimens or insulin pumps, but there are advantages and disadvantages to both insulin delivery methods. Continuous glucose monitoring during physical activity can be used to detect hypoglycemia when used as an adjunct rather than in place of capillary glucose tests.

Youth experience many health benefits from physical activity participation 9. In adults, regular physical activity has been associated with decreased mortality There is insufficient evidence on the ideal type, timing, intensity, and duration of exercise for optimal glycemic control.

Blood glucose responses to physical activity in type 1 diabetes are highly variable In general, aerobic exercise decreases blood glucose levels if performed during postprandial periods with the usual insulin dose administered at the meal before exercise 73and prolonged activity done then may cause exaggerated decreases 74 — Exercise while fasting may produce a lesser decrease or a small increase in blood glucose Variable glycemic responses to physical activity 72 make uniform recommendations for management of food intake and insulin dosing difficult.

As recommended in Table 1blood glucose concentrations should always be checked prior to exercise undertaken by individuals with type 1 diabetes. Carbohydrate intake required will vary with insulin regimens, timing of exercise, type of activity, and more 87but it will also depend on starting blood glucose levels.

Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion CSII users can reduce 90 or suspend 91 insulin delivery at the start of exercise, but this strategy does not always prevent hypoglycemia 91 Frequent blood glucose checks are required when implementing insulin and carbohydrate adjustments.

Suggested carbohydrate intake or other actions based on blood glucose levels at the start of exercise. may not require any additional carbohydrate intake. For prolonged activities at a moderate intensity, consume additional carbohydrate, as needed 0.

Test for ketones. Do not perform any exercise if moderate-to-large amounts of ketones are present. Initiate mild-to-moderate intensity exercise. If ketones are negative or traceconsider conservative insulin correction e. Adapted from Zaharieva and Riddell

: Benefits of exercise for blood sugar control

Diabetes and exercise - Better Health Channel Suggested initial pre-exercise meal insulin bolus reduction for activity started within 90 min after insulin administration. Sign me up. What Are The Symptoms Of Diabetes? Moderate walking is not likely to increase risk of foot ulcers or reulceration with peripheral neuropathy Evaluation of glucose control when a new strategy of increased carbohydrate supply is implemented during prolonged physical exercise in type 1 diabetes.
The importance of exercise when you have diabetes

Undertake muscle strengthening activities on at least 2 days each week. Strengthening activities include anything that requires your body to move against a weight or gravity. This would include activities such as lifting tins of food, repeated sitting and standing from a chair or seated leg raises.

Minimise the amount of time spent in prolonged sitting. Break up long periods of sitting as often as possible. Meet a friend for a walking date rather than a coffee, stand on public transport rather than sit or ask whether your workplace can provide standing workstations.

Increasing your general physical activity is also helpful, e. taking the stairs instead of the lift, moving during the ad breaks of your favourite TV program, completing housework, and gardening. Avoid watching too much TV or sitting at the computer for a long time.

Regular exercise is an important part of your diabetes management. It will help your insulin to work more efficiently and assist with your blood glucose management.

However, if you have fluctuating or high blood glucose levels i. Exercise in these circumstances can actually elevate blood glucose and increase ketone production. It may be necessary to reduce your insulin dose prior to exercise, depending on the intensity and duration.

Insulin adjustment will vary with each individual so it is important to discuss appropriate adjustments with your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. You may also require extra carbohydrate before, during and after exercise.

Discuss adjusting carbohydrate intake with your doctor or dietitian. How much exercise should I do? Benefits of exercise Exercising safely with diabetes Exercise programs for people with diabetes A guide to BGLs and exercise Steps to get started with exercise Exercise advice for people with type 1 diabetes How much exercise should I do?

Plan ahead — Dedicate time each day to exercise, it will be easier to keep to a schedule and you will start to form a routine. Motivation — Surround yourself with positive role models to remind you why exercise is important and encourage you to continue.

Reward yourself — Treat yourself to new exercise gear or a massage to keep you motivated and celebrate your achievements. Benefits of exercise Physical activity is one of the best things you can do for your overall health.

For a person with diabetes, exercise can help: Insulin to work better, which will improve your diabetes management Reduce insulin resistance and reduce blood glucose levels Improve joint and muscle movement, and strengthen bones Maintain a healthy weight Lower your blood pressure Reduce your risk of heart disease Reduce stress and anxiety Improve your sleep.

Exercise is important but before you start, make sure you assess safety first by considering the following: Where do you start?

How are your feet? What about changes in BGLs? Before an exercise session Ask yourself: Am I feeling well? It is not recommended that you exercise when you are feeling unwell.

Take time out to rest and start exercising again when you are feeling better. Have I checked my BGL? When you are starting a new exercise routine or changing your current routine, it is important to check your BGLs more regularly. For people who require blood glucose lowering medication or insulin you should check your BGLs before, during and after exercise to avoid hypoglycaemia.

During an exercise session Check your BGLs every minutes if the intensity, type or duration is new to you, or you experience symptoms of hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia.

After an exercise session Check your BGL and monitor it for up to 24 hours. Have a carbohydrate snack or meal, if required. Be aware of overnight hypoglycaemia. Have a low GI snack before bed if you think your BGLs might drop during the night.

If you require blood glucose lowering medication or insulin you may need to adjust your dose as your BGL reduces as a result of the exercise. This is particularly important if you are exercising at a high intensity or for longer than 30 minutes at a time.

Speak to your health care team before making any changes to your medication dose. A guide to BGLs and exercise Discover the effects of your blood glucose levels and exercise. What should my BGLs be when I exercise? Know the warning signs to stop exercising While exercise is generally a safe activity, there are some warning signs to look out for.

If you experience any of the following during exercise, stop and rest. Chest, abdominal, neck, jaw or arm pain or tightness Palpitations, irregular or racing heart beat Feeling faint, light headed or dizzy Leg cramps or pain Symptoms of hypoglycaemia stop immediately and treat!

Steps to get started with exercise Being active can help you manage your diabetes by keeping your blood glucose levels BGLs within your target range and helping you to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. He says,. I became a CDE [Certified Diabetes Educator] in an effort to better my community and my professional practice as a pharmacist.

Being a CDE allows me to educate patients and help enhance their understanding of how to control their blood sugar. Faheem: Regular exercise is an effective way to lower your blood sugar levels if you live with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

For some people with type 2 diabetes, exercise may work as effectively as some medications, and sometimes, with fewer side effects. Faheem: At least minutes of aerobic physical activity is recommended every week for example, 30 minutes a day for 5 days a week.

Aerobic exercises include activities with continuous movement, such as brisk walking, running, cycling, swimming, and other activities that increase your heart rate. Gradually increase the duration over time.

Resistance exercise, another type of physical activity, is recommended two to three times per week. Studies have shown the benefits of both aerobic and resistance exercise for people with diabetes, which together will have a greater impact. Faheem: If you take insulin or medications that increase the release of insulin, you'll need to track your blood sugar before, during and after exercise.

This will show you how your body responds to exercise, which can help you prevent potentially dangerous blood sugar fluctuations. Faheem: Exercise can affect blood sugar levels by decreasing them. The more strenuous the workout, the longer you will experience the effect on your blood sugar. Some intense exercises, such as heavy weightlifting, produce adrenaline which can cause a temporary increase in blood sugar levels.

Diabetes and exercise: When to monitor your blood sugar - Mayo Clinic

Exercise is essential for everyone—especially for people with diabetes. Being active most days of the week keeps you healthy by reducing long-term health risks, improving insulin sensitivity, and enhancing mood and overall quality of life.

Most of the time, working out causes blood glucose blood sugar to dip. But some people, after certain types of exercise, notice that their glucose levels actually rise during or after exercise.

Fear not! There are steps you can take to avoid this. Using your muscles helps burn glucose and improves the way insulin works. But you might see blood glucose go up after exercise, too. Exercise is important but before you start, make sure you assess safety first by considering the following: Where do you start?

How are your feet? What about changes in BGLs? Before an exercise session Ask yourself: Am I feeling well? It is not recommended that you exercise when you are feeling unwell. Take time out to rest and start exercising again when you are feeling better.

Have I checked my BGL? When you are starting a new exercise routine or changing your current routine, it is important to check your BGLs more regularly. For people who require blood glucose lowering medication or insulin you should check your BGLs before, during and after exercise to avoid hypoglycaemia.

During an exercise session Check your BGLs every minutes if the intensity, type or duration is new to you, or you experience symptoms of hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia. After an exercise session Check your BGL and monitor it for up to 24 hours. Have a carbohydrate snack or meal, if required.

Be aware of overnight hypoglycaemia. Have a low GI snack before bed if you think your BGLs might drop during the night. If you require blood glucose lowering medication or insulin you may need to adjust your dose as your BGL reduces as a result of the exercise.

This is particularly important if you are exercising at a high intensity or for longer than 30 minutes at a time. Speak to your health care team before making any changes to your medication dose.

A guide to BGLs and exercise Discover the effects of your blood glucose levels and exercise. What should my BGLs be when I exercise? Know the warning signs to stop exercising While exercise is generally a safe activity, there are some warning signs to look out for.

If you experience any of the following during exercise, stop and rest. Chest, abdominal, neck, jaw or arm pain or tightness Palpitations, irregular or racing heart beat Feeling faint, light headed or dizzy Leg cramps or pain Symptoms of hypoglycaemia stop immediately and treat!

Steps to get started with exercise Being active can help you manage your diabetes by keeping your blood glucose levels BGLs within your target range and helping you to achieve and maintain a healthy weight. The National Physical Activity Guidelines for Australian Adults recommend: Think of movement as an opportunity, not an inconvenience.

Be active every day in as many ways as you can. Engage in at least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity physical activity on most, preferably all, days of the week.

Do muscle strengthening activities on at least 2 days per week Break up long periods of sitting as often as possible, and If possible, also enjoy some regular, vigorous activity for extra health and fitness. Step 1 — Start small Doing any physical activity is better than doing none.

Step 2 — Move more Adults are recommended to be active on most, preferably all, days of the week. Which is your preferred exercise intensity level? The guidelines recommend you do between minutes of moderate intensity exercise each week.

What Causes Autoimmune Diabetes? Who Is At Risk? Genetics of Type 1a Type 1 Diabetes FAQs Introduction to Type 1 Research Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes Monitoring Diabetes Goals of Treatment Monitoring Your Blood Diabetes Log Books Understanding Your Average Blood Sugar Checking for Ketones Medications And Therapies Goals of Medication Type 1 Insulin Therapy Insulin Basics Types of Insulin Insulin Analogs Human Insulin Insulin Administration Designing an Insulin Regimen Calculating Insulin Dose Intensive Insulin Therapy Insulin Treatment Tips Type 1 Non Insulin Therapies Type 1 Insulin Pump Therapy What is an Insulin Pump Pump FAQs How To Use Your Pump Programming Your Pump Temporary Basal Advanced Programming What is an Infusion Set?

Diagnosing Diabetes Treatment Goals What is Type 2 Diabetes? Home » Living With Diabetes » Activity And Exercise » Benefits of Exercise.

How exercise can help lower your blood sugar - Diabetes Canada With increasing age, poor blood glucose control, and neuropathy, skin blood flow and sweating may be impaired in adults with type 1 , and type 2 diabetes, increasing the risk of heat-related illness. The guidelines for exercising with diabetes are pretty much a mirror image of the federal ones for all adults, regardless of blood sugar status. C Exercise training should progress appropriately to minimize risk of injury. The quiz is multiple choice. Exercise does not accelerate progression of kidney disease and can be undertaken safely, even during dialysis sessions.
Adrenaline Can Raise Blood Glucose Levels

What Are The Symptoms Of Diabetes? Diagnosing Diabetes Treatment Goals What is Type 1 Diabetes? What Causes Autoimmune Diabetes? Who Is At Risk? Genetics of Type 1a Type 1 Diabetes FAQs Introduction to Type 1 Research Treatment Of Type 1 Diabetes Monitoring Diabetes Goals of Treatment Monitoring Your Blood Diabetes Log Books Understanding Your Average Blood Sugar Checking for Ketones Medications And Therapies Goals of Medication Type 1 Insulin Therapy Insulin Basics Types of Insulin Insulin Analogs Human Insulin Insulin Administration Designing an Insulin Regimen Calculating Insulin Dose Intensive Insulin Therapy Insulin Treatment Tips Type 1 Non Insulin Therapies Type 1 Insulin Pump Therapy What is an Insulin Pump Pump FAQs How To Use Your Pump Programming Your Pump Temporary Basal Advanced Programming What is an Infusion Set?

Checking your blood glucose before doing any physical activity is important to prevent hypoglycemia low blood glucose. Talk to your diabetes care team doctor, nurse, dietitian, or pharmacist to find out if you are at risk for hypoglycemia. This may be:. Check your blood glucose again after 15 minutes.

If you want to continue your workout, you will usually need to take a break to treat your low blood glucose. Keep in mind that low blood glucose can occur during or long after physical activity.

It is more likely to occur if you:. If hypoglycemia interferes with your exercise routine, talk to your health care provider about the best treatment plan for you. Your provider may suggest eating a small snack before you exercise or they may make an adjustment to your medication s.

Regular exercise is an important part of your diabetes management. It will help your insulin to work more efficiently and assist with your blood glucose management.

However, if you have fluctuating or high blood glucose levels i. Exercise in these circumstances can actually elevate blood glucose and increase ketone production. It may be necessary to reduce your insulin dose prior to exercise, depending on the intensity and duration.

Insulin adjustment will vary with each individual so it is important to discuss appropriate adjustments with your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. You may also require extra carbohydrate before, during and after exercise.

Discuss adjusting carbohydrate intake with your doctor or dietitian. How much exercise should I do? Benefits of exercise Exercising safely with diabetes Exercise programs for people with diabetes A guide to BGLs and exercise Steps to get started with exercise Exercise advice for people with type 1 diabetes How much exercise should I do?

Plan ahead — Dedicate time each day to exercise, it will be easier to keep to a schedule and you will start to form a routine. Motivation — Surround yourself with positive role models to remind you why exercise is important and encourage you to continue.

Reward yourself — Treat yourself to new exercise gear or a massage to keep you motivated and celebrate your achievements. Benefits of exercise Physical activity is one of the best things you can do for your overall health.

For a person with diabetes, exercise can help: Insulin to work better, which will improve your diabetes management Reduce insulin resistance and reduce blood glucose levels Improve joint and muscle movement, and strengthen bones Maintain a healthy weight Lower your blood pressure Reduce your risk of heart disease Reduce stress and anxiety Improve your sleep.

Exercise is important but before you start, make sure you assess safety first by considering the following: Where do you start? How are your feet? What about changes in BGLs? Before an exercise session Ask yourself: Am I feeling well?

It is not recommended that you exercise when you are feeling unwell. Take time out to rest and start exercising again when you are feeling better. Have I checked my BGL? When you are starting a new exercise routine or changing your current routine, it is important to check your BGLs more regularly.

For people who require blood glucose lowering medication or insulin you should check your BGLs before, during and after exercise to avoid hypoglycaemia.

During an exercise session Check your BGLs every minutes if the intensity, type or duration is new to you, or you experience symptoms of hypoglycaemia or hyperglycaemia. After an exercise session Check your BGL and monitor it for up to 24 hours.

Have a carbohydrate snack or meal, if required. Be aware of overnight hypoglycaemia. Have a low GI snack before bed if you think your BGLs might drop during the night.

If you require blood glucose lowering medication or insulin you may need to adjust your dose as your BGL reduces as a result of the exercise. This is particularly important if you are exercising at a high intensity or for longer than 30 minutes at a time.

Regular exercise, including both Benefits of exercise for blood sugar control activity confrol resistance training, offers various and substantial health benefits for Benefits of exercise for blood sugar control with type 2 dor. Studies fkr shown that exercise Fat loss strategies better blood glucose control exercisf helps reduce excess body weight — execise of which are Benefots risk execise for diabetes. Specific types of exercise may also help with health problems that older adults with diabetes often experience, such as impaired balance and flexibility. Other evidence suggests that not exercising may increase some of the risks associated with type 2 diabetes. These risks include cardiovascular disease, which refers to conditions affecting the heart and blood vessels, and complications related to blood vessel damage, such as eye and kidney disease. Keep reading to learn more about type 2 diabetes and physical exercise, as well as other lifestyle practices that may help people manage the condition.

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